Global flavors spice up college menus

global foods flavors

From Maggi Spicy Seasoning.

Ethnic foods and beverages are in high demand by college and university students. And this group of diners are particularly interested in less-common global cuisines such as Japanese, Thai, Indian and Greek foods.

Some 47% of students said they would like their school to offer more ethnic foods and beverages, up six percentage points from two years earlier, according to Technomic’s recent College & University Consumer Trend Report.

An especially large contingent—60% of 18- to 24-year-olds surveyed—said they’d be likely to purchase Chinese food at least occasionally, the Technomic study found.

As international dishes and global flavors become more familiar, ethnic offerings will be increasingly viewed simply as flavor alternatives, rather than exotic specialties.

Foodservice directors are finding all sorts of creative ways to incorporate global, especially Asian, flavors on their menus. They’re infusing fresh produce with Asian spice for quick pickles. At Georgia Southern University, for example, they’ve menued a Sweet Chili Chicken Pizza that starts with wok-fried chicken. Around the country, they’re serving up super-trendy customizable rice and grain bowls with gochujang, Sriracha, wasabi, galangal root and more.

But sourcing all of those authentic spices and sauces can be a challenge. That’s where Maggi® comes in.

The No. 1 most frequently purchased food brand in the world, according to Kantar Worldpanel, Maggi provides a versatile range of products that can add authentic ethnic flavors to the menu. No wonder chefs in 80 countries around the world use Maggi products to save time and add consistent authentic flavors to their regional dishes.

Now these products are available in the United States through Nestlé Professional. The ubiquitous Maggi Seasoning, Sichuan-infused Spicy Seasoning, Thai-style curries and chicken and beef bases provide everything you need to create the dishes with a global twist that your diners crave. When you use Maggi products, it’s like having a team of specialist chefs (with all their favorite ingredients) to help you in your kitchen.

Maggi Seasoning can also be used to build savory flavor in all kinds of recipes, not just Asian-inspired dishes. Made from a proprietary triple fermentation process, Maggi Seasoning adds the quality of umami to foods. It acts as an amplifier, bringing out full flavor in all kinds of entrées, stir-fries, soups, and sauces. It enhances the savory notes in meat, poultry and seafood, and in vegetarian dishes, it adds a savory backbone of roasted flavor without adding meat or meat juices.

Used in a marinade, glaze, sauce or dip, Maggi Seasoning brightens the bold flavors in a variety of cuisines—and is a foundational ingredient to Filipino, Mexican, Polish, Malaysian and African dishes. It is also available in a 6.75-oz. tabletop format that allows customers to enhance food to their personal taste. The smaller size also allows Maggi Seasoning to be included in condiment stations.

To add more zing to foods, there’s Maggi Spicy Seasoning, with its unique Sichuan pepper heat and deep umami flavor. This new variation of the world-famous Maggi Seasoning is perfect for a range of dishes across nearly every type of cuisine, from European and Asian to Latin American and African.

Maggi Thai-Style Curry Pastes, available in green and red, put the bold, on-trend flavors of Thai cuisine within reach. Full of authentic flavors, including chili peppers, lemongrass, ginger, fish sauce and kaffir lime, these convenient pastes can be used to create the perfect curry, sauce or soup, or to add a Thai-style twist to any meat or vegetable dish. And they are gluten free and preservative free.

For the ultimate culinary versatility, there are Maggi Chicken and Beef Bases. These gluten free, meat-first chicken and beef bases provide perfectly balanced natural flavors and aromas. Maggi bases are versatile and easy to use, making them ideal for creating authentic-tasting dishes and delivering consistent, enhanced chicken and beef flavors in stews, ramen, rice and noodle bowls.
 

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