The best in the west

Foster Farms turkey offers authentic goodness, locally grown

From Foster Farms.

More than ever before, people want to know where their food came from and how it was raised and handled. They equate foods sourced close to home with quality, healthfulness, local pride and a more sustainable planet.

In fact, the way consumers think about healthy eating is changing, according to a recent study by the research firm Technomic. They are more likely to associate health with foods or menu items billed as “local,” “natural” or “organic” than those tagged with descriptors like “low-fat” or “low sodium,” which may suggest a lack of flavor.

Thus it’s not surprising that locally sourced meats and seafood was the number-one trend in the National Restaurant Association’s What’s Hot 2013 Chef Survey. All told, three of the top ten trends in the survey, which polled more than 1,800 American Culinary Federation chefs, revolved around local food.

Foster Farms Turkey products have been locally grown in California since 1939, when Max and Verda Foster founded their company, which is still family owned and operated to this day. Every Turkey product the company offers is grown and processed in California for foodservice operators and consumers primarily in the Western United States.

“Consumers and restaurant operators today are looking for everything from produce to poultry to be locally sourced,” says Jeff Hayman, Marketing Manager for Foodservice Turkey at Foster Farms, explaining why Foster Farms Turkey resonates with Westerners more than turkey hauled in from far-off regions. “Locally grown is a big hot-button issue. Our company has been able to provide locally grown Turkey products here in California and up and down the west coast to fill that need.”

With its locally grown appeal and superior slicing yield, appearance and taste, Foster Farms Turkey can put operators on the path to higher profits. Menu items backed by a high-equity brand like Foster Farms and identified with locally grown ingredients can command higher menu prices. So it makes good business sense to promote a Foster Farms California Turkey Burger, Foster Farms Turkey Po’ Boy Sandwich, or any of the myriad other menu ideas that are possible with Foster Farms Turkey, all with the taste that’s closest to home.

“We pride ourselves on producing a product that is grown and processed here in California and distributed throughout the Western United States,” says Hayman.

Foster Farms Turkey products satisfy the full range of menu needs:

• Ready to Cook Foster Farms Turkey roasted in your kitchen offers the irresistible homemade flavor that will add dollars to your bottom line.
• Foster Farms Fully Cooked Turkey is the versatile and convenient choice for carving, slicing and shaving.
• Foster Farms All Natural Turkey is a flavorful way to give nutrition-savvy diners on-trend menu options.
• Foster Farms Turkey Burgers are the better-tasting, better-for-you burgers with ready-to-cook convenience.

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