Alaska: Your source for sustainable seafood

From Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute.

Our commitment to responsible management and sustainability existed long before anyone ever heard of an eco-label and thanks to a sense of responsibility that spans generations of Alaskans this commitment never waivers. When we became a state in 1959 we wrote into our constitution that “fish…be utilized, developed and maintained on the sustained yield principle” making Alaska the only state in the nation with such explicit conservation language as a foundation for resource management. It means that all interests – fisherman, scientists, conservationists and citizens – work together to determine how to responsibly manage our fisheries so that there will be an abundance of wild seafood to harvest now and always. 

In many ways it can be said that the seafood industry touches the lives of almost all Alaskans. In fact, fishing and processing employ more people than any other industry in Alaska, encompassing a full 32% of our workforce. As responsible stewards, each and every Alaskan understands the absolute importance of preserving this prized resource for generations to come.

We know that sustainable seafood is a complex issue that can be confusing for operators and customers alike, but the good news is that sourcing sustainable fish is in fact easy: just make sure that your seafood comes from Alaska.  It’s the simplest way to guarantee that your fish is wild, natural and sustainable because that’s the only kind of seafood that we harvest. 

To further verify our adherence to the highest of sustainability practices, the majority of Alaska’s fisheries have been evaluated using a third-party certification called the FAO-Based Responsible Fisheries Management certification program.  This certification shows that Alaska’s fisheries meet the criteria of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, the most comprehensive and respected fisheries management guidelines in the world.  The FAO Code & Guidelines were created with the participation and input of the world’s governments, fishery scientists and conservationists and that means the state’s fisheries are assessed against the world’s highest and most internationally accepted standard.

We want your diners to enjoy both the unparalleled quality of our fish and the pleasure that comes from knowing their food is responsibly harvested, so please visit us at www.alaskaseafood.org to learn more about how we can support your sales of Alaska seafood. 

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