2012 Contract Census Report

Recovery? Contractors see growth in 2011 according to FSD's 2012 Contract Census.

FoodService Director’s 2012 Contractor Census is a snapshot of the contract market, based on information from the 2010-2011 fiscal year, supplied by 38 firms.

Contract Census Highlights

  • The 38 companies in our survey manage 22,911 accounts in various markets. The largest number of contracted accounts among the core non-commercial markets was B&I, with 7,362, followed by schools, 4,368; hospitals, 3,702; colleges, 3,223; and long-term care, 1,262.
  • Revenue increased in 2011 versus 2010 for these companies by an average of 6.7%. Tier 3 companies—those with revenue less than $100 million—saw slower growth, 4.5%, than those companies with higher revenues.
  • Among the top three contractors, Compass Group saw the largest increase in revenue, with 11.1%, compared to Aramark’s 4.8% and Sodexo’s 3%. The Tier 1 companies saw the largest shift in revenues, increasing from a -0.4% revenue change in 2010 versus 2009 to a 6.8% revenue change in 2011 versus 2010.
  • The three companies that registered the largest percentage revenue growth in 2011 versus 2010 were Trusthouse Services Corp., Cura Hospitality and Unidine Corp. Trusthouse saw a 62.8% revenue increase, in large part due to acquiring Minnesota-based A’viands Food & Service Management. Cura’s 34.9% revenue growth is attributable to a 100% client retention from 2010 and adding two regional hospital and two large long-term care accounts with higher volumes. Unidine’s 23.3% growth came even though the company had only two more accounts in 2011 than it did in 2010. The company shed some of its smaller accounts, mostly in B&I, and added healthcare accounts, which tend to be larger, making the per-facility revenue higher than in 2010.  

B&I’s Shrinking Customer Base
In the past couple of years there has been a decline in the number of B&I locations that offer foodservice programs. The main causes for that decline, by percentage, as cited by our survey respondents:  

 

 

Local Produce Remains on Top
Ninety-seven percent of the companies in this year’s survey say they purchase locally sourced products. Produce, once again, was cited as the most often purchased local item. The percentages, by product type: 

Download: 
PDF icon 2012_Contract_Census_Report.pdf

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