Paul King

Paul King
Paul King
foodservicedirector@winsightmedia.com

A journalist for more than three decades, Paul began his career as a general assignment reporter, working for several daily and weekly newspapers in southwestern Pennsylvania. A decision to move to New York City in 1984 sent his career path in another direction when he was hired to be an associate editor at Food Management magazine. He has covered the foodservice industry ever since. After 11 years at Food Management, he joined Nation’s Restaurant News in 1995. In June 2006 he was hired as senior editor at FoodService Director and became its editor-in-chief in March 2007. A native of Pittsburgh, he is a graduate of Duquesne University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and speech.


On Sept. 15, members of two healthcare foodservice groups will get together for a one-day seminar that at least one person hopes will be the start of a beautiful relationship.

The FDA’s new rules on gluten-free foods went into effect this month. What will be the impact on your operations?

The battle over genetically modified foodstuffs is threatening to reach a boiling point.

Former White House Chef Roland Mesnier says what others say about you is more valuable than what you believe about yourself.

As someone who has been attending foodservice industry conferences for nearly 30 years, I know how difficult it is to come up with the next “big thing.” But at the recent National Leadership Conference of the Association of Nutrition and Foodservice Professionals (ANFP), held in Minneapolis, the conference planning committee offered a session that might be exactly that.

Food journalist Michael Pollan spoke of this, and more, at this month’s culinary conference at the University of Massachusetts.

A new model for hospitals is being created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its impact will be felt by patients, staff and visitors, even in foodservice.
Rich Daehn, corporate director of culinary services for Benedictine Health System (BHS), in Duluth, Minn., is definitely a think-outside-the-box kind of guy. How else would you describe a man who...

One of the sessions I attended at last month’s Association for Healthcare Foodservice (AHF) conference was on the use of nutrition apps in foodservice.

After a brief hiatus, Coston returned to her old job, where her role has grown.

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Ideas and Innovation
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FSD Resources