Paul King

Paul King
Paul King

A journalist for more than three decades, Paul began his career as a general assignment reporter, working for several daily and weekly newspapers in southwestern Pennsylvania. A decision to move to New York City in 1984 sent his career path in another direction when he was hired to be an associate editor at Food Management magazine. He has covered the foodservice industry ever since. After 11 years at Food Management, he joined Nation’s Restaurant News in 1995. In June 2006 he was hired as senior editor at FoodService Director and became its editor-in-chief in March 2007. A native of Pittsburgh, he is a graduate of Duquesne University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and speech.

On Sept. 15, members of two healthcare foodservice groups will get together for a one-day seminar that at least one person hopes will be the start of a beautiful relationship.

The FDA’s new rules on gluten-free foods went into effect this month. What will be the impact on your operations?

The battle over genetically modified foodstuffs is threatening to reach a boiling point.

Former White House Chef Roland Mesnier says what others say about you is more valuable than what you believe about yourself.

As someone who has been attending foodservice industry conferences for nearly 30 years, I know how difficult it is to come up with the next “big thing.” But at the recent National Leadership Conference of the Association of Nutrition and Foodservice Professionals (ANFP), held in Minneapolis, the conference planning committee offered a session that might be exactly that.

Food journalist Michael Pollan spoke of this, and more, at this month’s culinary conference at the University of Massachusetts.

A new model for hospitals is being created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its impact will be felt by patients, staff and visitors, even in foodservice.
Rich Daehn, corporate director of culinary services for Benedictine Health System (BHS), in Duluth, Minn., is definitely a think-outside-the-box kind of guy. How else would you describe a man who...

One of the sessions I attended at last month’s Association for Healthcare Foodservice (AHF) conference was on the use of nutrition apps in foodservice.

After a brief hiatus, Coston returned to her old job, where her role has grown.


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Industry News & Opinion

A new law in Washington will expand Breakfast After the Bell programs throughout the state, the Daily Fly reports.

Signed into law on Wednesday by Gov. Jay Inslee, HB 1508 requires that schools in which at least 70% of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals offer Breakfast After the Bell by the time the 2019-2020 school year begins.

The food offered at breakfast must meet federal nutrition standards and can’t be made up of more than 25% added sugar. Schools must also give preference to food that is fresh and grown in the state.

The breakfast period can...

Industry News & Opinion

The University of Southern California in Los Angeles will begin offering fresh kosher meals three times a week at its USC Village Dining Hall, the Daily Trojan reports.

The meals will be delivered to the dining hall every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evening by a local kosher butcher beginning March 20. The butcher will also deliver sandwiches, salads and other kosher items to a marketplace on campus.

Around 15 Orthodox students who are on meal plans will be able to enjoy the meals, according to the Daily Trojan. Students can receive their meals at the cashier’s desk in...

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Industry News & Opinion

The Missouri House of Representatives has initially approved a bill that would enable students with dietary issues to forgo mandatory meal plans at public colleges and universities, U.S. News reports.

Approved Tuesday, the bill would grant students with medical documentation of food sensitivities, food allergies or medical dietary issues the right to opt out of meal plans.

Supporters of the bill say it will allow students to not have to pay for food they can’t safely eat, while opponents say that the bill will negatively impact schools financially. According to legislative...

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