Paul King

Paul King
Paul King
foodservicedirector@winsightmedia.com

A journalist for more than three decades, Paul began his career as a general assignment reporter, working for several daily and weekly newspapers in southwestern Pennsylvania. A decision to move to New York City in 1984 sent his career path in another direction when he was hired to be an associate editor at Food Management magazine. He has covered the foodservice industry ever since. After 11 years at Food Management, he joined Nation’s Restaurant News in 1995. In June 2006 he was hired as senior editor at FoodService Director and became its editor-in-chief in March 2007. A native of Pittsburgh, he is a graduate of Duquesne University with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and speech.


How powerful has the world of Facebook and Twitter become? Strong enough, apparently, to create controversy where none exists.

I don’t know how true it is that opposites attract, except in magnetism, but when opposites are attracted to one another, they can be very successful together. Ernie Collins and Fedele Bauccio are proof of that.

School foodservice operators might consider Ann Cooper and Janey Thornton to be polar opposites. They’d call Thornton, deputy undersecretary at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and a former school foodservice director, the traditionalist, working the system and trying to effect change from within.

Beginning with our February issue, you will see a slight change to our annual Industry Census reports. In years past, we have surveyed directors from 50 to 100 of the largest institutions and companies. This year, for the first time, we have included a mix of large, medium and small school districts, and will do the same for colleges, hospitals and corporations later in the year.

Back in the 1980s, when “The ‘A’ Team” was enjoying a run as a hot TV action series, George Peppard, who played ‘A’ Team leader Col. John “Hannibal” Smith, had a stock phrase: “I love it when a plan comes together.”

I am amazed at how quickly this year has flown by. It seems that each year moves a little faster than the one before—although I was done with my Christmas shopping a full week before the holiday.

I have always been skeptical of claims that the quality of foodservice is a determining factor in a student’s choice of college. When I was considering my higher education, cost and academics were my main measurements and food never entered into the equation.

Despite what our expense reports might suggest, my staff and I don’t get out of the office enough. But I did get the opportunity to visit with a few readers last week when I traveled to the University of New Hampshire.

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