Patricia Cobe

Patricia Cobe
foodservicedirector@winsightmedia.com


Nashville hot chicken, a regional favorite, also has been on the bucket lists of food lovers visiting the Music City. Now it has flocked to other locales.
egg waffle
Omelet stations are a popular breakfast option among Texas Tech University’s 37,000 students, says Dewey McMurrey, executive chef of operations at the school.
What’s happening in the streetside channel of the business could cross over to noncommercial facilities.
samosa stuffed potato
To create a healthier but gratifying version of a normally calorie-ridden stuffed baked potato, Chuck Hatfield took a few cues from Indian cuisine.
pho bowl
Stations focusing on salads, sandwiches and omelets—last decade’s customization models—have evolved into a much wider variety of DIY consumer options.
ponce city market food
What’s happening street side could work in noncommercial settings.
Last year’s dominant menu trends might sound familiar, as foodservice directors have been riding those currents for some time. But the emphasis shifted.
philly cheesesteak
To “clean” up his school’s cheesesteak, Chef Kevin Frank replaced the meat product with one that’s more healthful and saves seven cents per serving.
churro smores
Some operators are going the speed-scratch route, starting with ready-made components and adding fresh ingredients back-of-house to create signature desserts.
Here are three currents that could splash into college foodservice and other noncommercial sectors.

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Industry News & Opinion

Risley Dining Room at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., has just become 100 percent gluten-free, 14850.com reports.

For the past two years, the university has slowly phased out gluten in the dining hall’s menu by eliminating it in its stir fries, biscuits and brownies.

Instead of offering gluten-free versions of typical college fare, including pizza and pasta, the dining service team aimed for more sophisticated restaurant-style items.

Along with being gluten-free, Risley is also peanut free and tree-nut free.

The dining room is the second college eatery...

Industry News & Opinion

James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., recently hosted a weeklong program called Weigh the Waste, which aimed to show students how much food gets wasted in dining halls, The Breeze reports.

Throughout the week, students placed food they were about to throw away on a scale located near the trash bins at one of their dining halls. At the end of the week, the school tallied the waste and saw that 817 pounds of food had been wasted.

School officials hope that the annual program, which it’s hosted since 2015, will remind dining hall patrons to only take as much food as...

Industry News & Opinion

The University of Maryland will begin offering weekly specials at all of its dining halls this semester, The Diamond Back reports.

The weekday specials will allow Dining Services to offer past menu items that students miss as well as new dishes students have been requesting, according to a spokesperson.

Students can find out which specials are being offered each week via dining hall table tents as well as through Dining Services’ social media. During select weeks, the specials may reflect a particular theme, such as Taste of the South.

Read the full story via...

Menu Development
chicken tetrazzini bowl

The No Whey station in the main dining hall at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro, Ga., offers students meals that are free of the eight most common allergens. When Brittany Parham, the dietitian who oversees the station, polled food-sensitive students on which favorites they missed most, “comfort foods” was the overwhelming response. Parham, who herself has food allergies, worked with chefs on the 20,000-student campus to focus on allergen-free versions of pasta bakes, biscuits, banana bread and other down-home dishes. Recently, the chefs reworked the school’s traditional chicken...

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