Lindsey Ramsey

Lindsey Ramsey
Contributing Editor

At EVK (nicknamed Everybody’s Kitchen) Residential Dining at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, bold color choices and natural light have brought a modern sensibility to...
Iraj Fernando has not allowed his 13 years of restaurant experience to be forgotten since his switch to non-commercial. As executive chef/manager for Southern Foodservice Management Inc., at Bosch...

I’ve written about how I think it is semi-ridiculous to rank the food at different colleges, but this is just too much fun to ignore.

I think I experienced my first jaw-dropping moment covering the non-commercial industry when, early in my tenure here at FoodService Director, I got the chance to tour the then-new New York Times cafeteria, run by Restaurant Associates.

We at FoodService Director have long been committed to providing operators with ideas to do their jobs better, often by sharing ideas from within the industry. But we decided it was time to expand...
You would think simply attending Yale University would be enough of an experience to remember, but Rafi Taherian, executive director of Yale Dining in New Haven, Conn., believes creating memorable...

In my five years at FoodService Director, I’ve visited many operations to see the sights and taste the food. Mostly, I’ve visited college campuses where my sense memory from my time in college still informed my opinion of the food.

This year’s Dine-Around will showcase Ybor City, Tampa’s Latin Quarter. We talked to staff from each of the Dine-Around restaurants on this year’s agenda to get the inside scoop on what kind of culinary delights attendees can expect March 3.

I don’t think it’s a stretch to say Steal This Idea is the signature feature of FoodService Director. Our hope is to present ideas from all the market segments on a variety of topics, in order to help you do your job better.

This week I head home to Kansas City for the holidays. What is waiting for me—foodwise— might surprise you. This is because my family decided, about six or seven years ago, that we were done with “traditional” Christmas Day meals. Instead we gather together to enjoy a feast designed around a theme.


More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

A new law in Washington will expand Breakfast After the Bell programs throughout the state, the Daily Fly reports.

Signed into law on Wednesday by Gov. Jay Inslee, HB 1508 requires that schools in which at least 70% of students qualify for free or reduced-price meals offer Breakfast After the Bell by the time the 2019-2020 school year begins.

The food offered at breakfast must meet federal nutrition standards and can’t be made up of more than 25% added sugar. Schools must also give preference to food that is fresh and grown in the state.

The breakfast period can...

Industry News & Opinion

The University of Southern California in Los Angeles will begin offering fresh kosher meals three times a week at its USC Village Dining Hall, the Daily Trojan reports.

The meals will be delivered to the dining hall every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evening by a local kosher butcher beginning March 20. The butcher will also deliver sandwiches, salads and other kosher items to a marketplace on campus.

Around 15 Orthodox students who are on meal plans will be able to enjoy the meals, according to the Daily Trojan. Students can receive their meals at the cashier’s desk in...

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Younger consumers are driving an increased focus on sustainability, and more consumers overall are demanding a wider variety of seafood on menus. With shifting interest in seafood, operators need to be familiar with the seafood consumer—who they are, what they’re looking for and when they eat it—to more effectively boost interest in seafood dishes.

Understand consumer habits

Technomic’s 2017 Center of the Plate: Seafood & Vegetarian report finds that 65% of consumers eat seafood at least occasionally (once every 90 days or more), either as an...

Industry News & Opinion

The Missouri House of Representatives has initially approved a bill that would enable students with dietary issues to forgo mandatory meal plans at public colleges and universities, U.S. News reports.

Approved Tuesday, the bill would grant students with medical documentation of food sensitivities, food allergies or medical dietary issues the right to opt out of meal plans.

Supporters of the bill say it will allow students to not have to pay for food they can’t safely eat, while opponents say that the bill will negatively impact schools financially. According to legislative...

FSD Resources