Patrick Picciocchi

Lima Estates' Patrick Picciocchi believes in providing the tools to his staff to complete tasks.

Why Selected?

Marianne Jones, regional director of culinary and nutrition services for ACTS, says: Patrick believes in providing the tools to his staff to complete tasks. He provides direction to his team and steps out of their way as they achieve their objectives. He is dedicated and willing to take on any assignment to make his team successful. Over the past year, Patrick has increased menu offerings. He instituted special events designed as monotony breakers to keep his residents interested in socializing, trying new foods and guessing what he might come up with next.

Details

Culinary and Nutrition Service Director, Lima Estates (ACTS Retirement-Life Communities), Media, PA
Age: 29
Education: B.S. in hotel, restaurant and institutional management from the University of Delaware in Newark; working on an M.B.A. (food and agriculture) from Delaware Valley College in Doylestown, Pa.
Years at organization: 1

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

The happiness that this culinary department has given to the residents through all the culinary events that we do and through the extra items that we do, whether that be a barbecue event outside or a holiday where they are happy to bring their family for an Easter brunch. I really feel proud when a resident can come to me and say, “I was proud to bring my family here.”

Q. What would you say you excel at over more seasoned colleagues?

The idea of change and the willingness to start new projects. I get bored very easily.

Q. What's the best career advice you've been given?

My dad told me to find something you enjoy. He told me it’s all work but as long as you like what you’re doing you’ll be happy doing it.

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

The excitement that I see in my staff. I feel that they are getting to utilize their talents to the fullest more than they were before. I see doors opening to them. It comes down to them having a better relationship with the residents, and the residents are getting better service now because of it.

Q. What would you like to accomplish in your career in the next two years?

To finish my M.B.A in 2012. I want to fine-tune my management skills and help the company achieve its goals.

Q. What's been your funniest on-the-job disaster?

The day before Mother’s Day our oven blew out. I had more than 130 extra guests that were coming the next day for brunch. The maintenance department came and did a patch job, but it was good enough to get me through until Monday.

Q. What can you look back at now and laugh at?

I was an executive chef with ACTS and I became a culinary director. I went from managing 12 people to 100 and an entire department and I had this whole range of emotions from fear to excitement. Now I look back and say, it wasn’t so bad and it’s just more people to help and coach in their careers.

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