Nick Barlow

Nick Barlow, foodservice manager, Saint Francis Hospital South in Tulsa, Okla., started as a clinical dietitian at the system’s main campus and was promoted to manager at his current location in 2007.

Why Selected?

Lisette Coston, nutrition and food service director for the Saint Francis Health System, says: Nick started as a clinical dietitian at the system’s main campus and was promoted to manager at his current location in 2007. In his first two weeks as a manager, he transitioned out a contract management company, expanded the kitchen, and opened a new retail operation and a room service program. These actions saved the system around $200,000 the first year. During the past three years, Nick has reduced FTEs by 5.6 through cross training staff and streamlining operations. Nick deserves to be recognized as a rising star because he possesses the leadership qualities required for success: charisma, motivation, self-guidance and a willingness to change with the demands of foodservice.

Details

Foodservice Manager, Saint Francis Hospital, Tulsa, OK
Age: 30
Education: B.S. nutritional sciences from the University of Oklahoma, Norman
Years at organization: 7

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

I took over this location from a contract company, so we started everything from scratch. I didn’t really know any of my employees. Everyone worked through it all together. The fact that we started with nothing and got to where we are now is a proud accomplishment.

Q. What's been the biggest challenge you've had to overcome?

The biggest challenge and accomplishment are all rolled into one. When I came here I was a clinical dietitian. With this position I moved over to the foodservice side. We started a new system; we were cook-chill and now we are room service. Addressing everything that comes with room service was a big challenge.

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

Earning respect from the other managers.

Q. What would you like to accomplish in your career in the next two years?

I’d like to expand our cafeteria and turn it more into a restaurant style of setting rather than a generic cafeteria setting. I want to make it more personable.

Q. What's been your funniest on-the-job disaster?

I had one of my employees drop a whole bucket of cornstarch and it covered our whole prep area. Cornstarch mops up so easy whenever it just gums together.

Q. What can you look back at now and laugh at?

All the hours that I put in when we first started. I pretty much worked open to close, seven days a week for the first three months. I basically lived here.

Under 30

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