Misty Phillips

Misty Phillips, general helper for Fairborn City (Ohio) Schools, is the model of an exceptional employee by being quick to notice obstacles and always being positive when planning the solutions

Why Selected?

Paula Montgomery, child nutrition director, says: Misty is the model of an exceptional employee. She is quick to notice obstacles and is always positive when planning the solutions. She is always compassionate to employees and students. She has great leadership skills and takes the time to evaluate areas that are in need of improvement. She is a great planner and always follows through.

Details

General Helper, Fiarborn City Schools, Fairborn, OH
Age: 26
Education: High school diploma from Fairborn High School and Greene County Career Center
Years at organization: 7

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

Receiving this award and having Paula nominate me. The fact that she felt I deserved this is a great accomplishment.

Q. What would you say you excel at over more seasoned colleagues?

I think I excel in knowing more about computers and linking business to technology. A lot of other people think of our job just as serving lunch and they don’t think of us as making money.

Q. What's the best career advice you've been given?

To keep applying for more positions and to reach higher in foodservice.

Q. What's been the biggest challenge you've had to overcome?

My shyness. I was able to do that by becoming comfortable with the people that I worked with and the kids that I’m around. They make it easy to come out of my shell.

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

When you have a kid who is in kindergarten and they go off to another school and they see you and remember who you are.

Q. What would you like to accomplish in your career in the next two years?

I would like to be more involved in leadership. I also plan on going back to college to study to be a foodservice director.

Q. What can you look back at now and laugh at?

A little girl urinated on my foot. She was standing next to me and she backed up. I asked her what she was doing and she just got really quiet. I looked down and she was going to the bathroom.I was also electrocuted. The power strip for my computer didn’t have a back on it. When my computer shut down I went to flip the switch on the power cord, I grabbed the wires on the back of the strip and was electrocuted. At the time it was rather scary, but now that it’s all over, I can laugh at it.

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