Krissy Lane, R.D.

Krissy Lane implemented an advanced tray preparation system at Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare.

Why Selected?

Patricia Bryant, R.D., chief of nutrition and food services, says: This is a complex medical center with two campuses that serves approximately 1,500 meals per day. Knowing the importance of complying with HACCP guidelines, Krissy implemented a new advanced tray preparation system in conjunction with an innovative computerized temperature system that work together to ensure food quality and safety. Krissy also received a best practice award from the medical center for writing a vitamin K menu for patients receiving Coumadin [a medication used to prevent heart attacks and blood clots]. She is a very dedicated and hardworking young dietitian who is full of energy and provides new ideas that have made a great impact in our operation. Krissy’s strong passion for education and her leadership skills allow her to teach evening nutrition classes at a local university. She also works as a dietetic internship preceptor with 14 master’s of science students each year. She has proved to be a preceptor who is dependable, responsible and honest. 

Details

Acting Food Service Systems Management Dietitian, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, Little Rock, Ark.
Age: 28
Education: B.S. and master’s in nutrition from the University of Central Arkansas, in Conway, Ark.
Years at organization: 5

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

Finishing my master’s degree. 

Q. What would you say you excel at over more seasoned colleagues?

I feel that I bring a fresh insight into technology within my service. I love computers and other gadgets and use this knowledge to advance my career.

Q. What's the best career advice you've been given?

To aim myself down the path I want to follow and to work hard and never give up.

Q. What's been the biggest challenge you've had to overcome?

Being in the administrative field at my age is sometimes a challenge. I have to remind myself that I have to work a little bit harder. Sometimes people who are older than me ask how old I am and might not listen to me because of my age. I have to prove that I can do my job, even though I’m young. 

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

The most rewarding thing about my job is working with veterans on a daily basis. I am very honored to serve those who served our country. 

Q. What would you like to accomplish in your career in the next two years?

I hope to be the best administrative dietitian that I can be. I want to keep working to increase our patient satisfaction scores. I want to continue mentoring dietetic interns at the VA and continue teaching online classes at Liberty University. 

Q. What can you look back at now and laugh at?

How busy I thought life was before I had a child. I have a one-and-a-half-year-old and I’m extremely busier now than I was before. 

Under 30

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