Julie Tucker

Julie Tucker’s energy and passion inspire all her colleagues at Broome-Tioga BOCES. She is continually delivering a positive outcome to challenging projects.

Why Selected?

Mark Bordeau, senior food service director, and Raymond Denniston, special project coordinator, says: Julie’s energy and passion inspire us all. She is challenged by any project that will have a positive outcome for children and the community and is continually delivering a positive outcome to those projects. She has a passion to make the quality of life better for those she feels fortunate to reach. Some of Julie’s accomplishments include a breakfast in the classroom pilot; designing healthy snack recipe cards, which are passed out at doctor’s offices and elementary schools; and submitting applications for the HealthierUS program.


Registered Dietitian, Broome-Tioga BOCES, Binghamton, NY
Age: 24
Education: B.S. in nutritional sciences from Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.
Years at organization: 1

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

Six of our districts have been designated as HealthierUS districts. Others are starting breakfast in the classroom in one school and winning a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant to lower sodium in our schools.

Q. What's been the biggest challenge you've had to overcome?

Working with many different personalities. I communicate with nurses, doctors, staff and kids on a daily basis.

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

When I work with kids in the classroom about nutrition, I love seeing the kids involved and interested in learning about nutrition. Last week, a child asked for an extra serving of broccoli, so the kids are actually eating the healthy food.

Q. What would you like to accomplish in your career in the next two years?

Decrease sodium in lunches, use more local food, apply for more HealthierUS schools and get more involved in the state dietetics association.

Q. What's been your funniest on-the-job disaster?

I was doing a demonstration on our local TV station. I was working with three kids to make fruit and yogurt parfaits. All the kids knew we were making that, but when one kid tasted it while the cameras were rolling, he said he didn’t like yogurt and ran off stage. We retaped that part.

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