Julie Staples

Julie Staples has made an impact on foodservice by leading the training of culinary staff in the new recipe testing process to ensure accuracy.

Why Selected?

According to Lisa Eberhart, R.D., dietitian, Julie Staples has made an impact on foodservice by:

  • Establishing and implementing a new recipe testing process that has transformed the accuracy of dining program recipes, nutrition and costs
  • Developing new university dining menus focused on scratch cooking, nutrition, allergens and taste
  • Leading the training of culinary staff in the new recipe testing process to ensure accuracy

Details

Recipe Development Chef, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
Age: 28
Education: B.S. from NC State in polymer and color chemistry, associate degree in culinary arts from The Culinary Institute of America
Years at organization: 2

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

Seeing the success of the 12 new restaurant venues that have opened in the past year across campus. Knowing that I was instrumental in the development of the menus and recipes in those locations is my proudest accomplishment. Since I graduated from NC State and experienced dining as a student, to know that I have made such a significant impact on the dining program at my alma mater means a lot to me.

Q. What would you say you excel at over more seasoned colleagues?

Having a strong background in science and math, as well as being very detail oriented, helps me to excel when it comes to the precision we require for recipe development and the subsequent nutritional analysis.

Q. What's the best career advice you've been given?

There are two pieces of advice that I always try to remember. The first is to never settle for mediocrity. And the second is to own your mistakes and learn from them; that is the only way to improve.

Q. What's been the biggest challenge you've had to overcome?

One of the biggest challenges I’ve had to overcome was adapting to the large scale of food production at a university versus that of traditional restaurant service.

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

Having the opportunity to teach and mentor others.

Q. What would you like to accomplish in your career in the next two years?

I would like to become a Certified Research Chef and continue in my pursuit of a B.S. in food science. 

Q. What's been your funniest on-the-job disaster?

At my first job out of culinary school, I was working a busy Sunday morning omelet station and tried to flip the omelet too soon. There was too much liquid egg still in the pan and when the omelet landed post flip, I was sprayed with runny egg all down my face, in front of a long line of guests. I was mortified, but the guests and my fellow cooks had a good laugh.

Q. What can you look back at now and laugh at?

How serious I was when I first started. I have learned to relax a bit and laugh at myself, although I am still known to get hyper focused and caught up in projects.

Under 30

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