Deanna Dreyer

Deanna Dreyer's attention to detail has made her a success at Wesley Glen Retirement Community.

Why Selected?

According to Jay Dorsey, director of dining services, Deanna has made her mark on foodservices at Wesley Glen by:

• Being ahead of her time and coming to the community with the experience of a seasoned foodservice industry professional

• Being consistent with all the details of the operation, while exploring new ideas to improve current resident services

• Overcoming obstacles, such as budget cuts and staffing readjustments, while helping the community achieve a five-star quality rating

Details

Dining Services Supervisor, Wesley Glen Retirement Community, Columbus, Ohio
Age: 23
Education: B.S. in dietetics from Ohio State University
Years at organization: 1

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

Improving customer service. We hold customer service seminars for our diet aides where we go over things we want them to do when they interact with the residents. It’s not like a hospital where you only see the patients for a short period of time. I like to have the diet aides develop a relationship with the residents. Mealtimes are a big part of our residents’ day and they really look forward to them. I work hard to make sure mealtimes are a pleasant experience. 

Q. What would you say you excel at over more seasoned colleagues?

My flexibility and willingness to go the extra mile.

Q. What's the best career advice you've been given?

To make connections with people in the industry, whether it be former employers or people I meet outside of work. Those relationships will always be valuable throughout my career. 

Q. What's been the biggest challenge you've had to overcome?

The biggest challenge is when the residents pass away. I strive to foster relationships with the residents and I motivate my staff to do the same. However, this makes it especially difficult when a resident that we serve every day moves on. But the sadness that comes with these events also highlights the bond that the staff form with those who live here. 

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

Getting any type of compliment from the residents. They tell me that I’m a good supervisor or I’ve gone above and beyond. When you really see that you are making a difference in the residents’ life, that’s the most rewarding.

Q. What would you like to accomplish in your career in the next two years?

I’m interested in furthering my education, possibly with a master’s degree. I would like to become a certified dietitian and work in a clinical setting. I think with the dietetic and supervisor background I could make a difference. 

Q. What can you look back at now and laugh at?

The residents’ interactions with each other. It is not so much something that I find entertaining, but those are memories that I will always enjoy. They show that even in our old age we can find comfort in one another.

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