Danielle Fanter

Danielle Fanter was hired at Legacy Retirement Communities as a server, which sparked her interest for the love of food.

Why Selected?

Robert Darrah, food service director, says: Danielle was hired as a server, which I believe sparked her interest for the love of food. Recognizing her raw talent and desire to succeed, she was promoted to prep cook only six months after being in her day-server position. She completed the DM&A Healthcare Culinary Academy and became a certified healthcare chef. Danielle brings life, energy and passion to her position. Her artistry as a culinarian has blossomed during the past two years, and she’s set herself apart from the other six chefs on our staff.

Details

Associate Chef, Legacy Retirement Communities, Lincoln, NE
Age: 28
Education: High school and some community college
Years at organization: 5

Get to know

Q. What has been your proudest accomplishment?

Being recognized for this award. It’s an honor and a humbling experience. When I was notified that I was being selected I felt like all my hard work was paying off.

Q. What would you say you excel at over more seasoned colleagues?

I’m a very fast-paced worker and a quick study. I’m open to learn and grow and not stuck in my own ways. I’m very energetic and an overachiever.

Q. What's the best career advice you've been given?

Never expect anything to be given to you. You have to work hard for what you want.

Q. What's been the biggest challenge you've had to overcome?

Working with other chefs who have more than 20 years of experience and trying to learn from them as much as I can but at the same time trying to stand out and add my own flair and originality to my cooking. Also proving that I can hold everything down on my own.

Q. What's been your most rewarding moment?

Being able to achieve the small goals I’ve set for myself in the past couple of years and move up in the company. Just coming to work every day and trying to do better and accomplishing my work is very rewarding.

Q. What's been your funniest on-the-job disaster?

I heard my manager scream from the storeroom. He was putting an order away. As soon as I came around the corner I saw that he had dropped an entire case of dressing. He was covered from head to toe, and it was dripping from the ceiling. All I could do was stand there and laugh.

Q. What can you look back at now and laugh at?

One of the first times that I had the kitchen to myself and I was doing an à la carte item—grilled cheese. I walked away to do some other production work and I forgot about it. I came back and it was a very small piece of burned up bread. It was kind of embarrassing.

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