Hattie Hill WFF's new President, CEO

Hill takes over for the Women's Foodservice Forum June 1.

Beginning June 1, Hattie Hill will be the new president and CEO of the Women's Foodservice Forum (WFF). 

Hill is an international leadership development expert, business owner, best-selling author and globally renowned thought leader. During her more than 30 years as the CEO of Hattie Hill Enterprises Inc, her organization provided leadership development for thousands of senior leaders at numerous Fortune 500 companies and major organizations throughout North America and 51 countries, including such foodservice companies as McDonald's, Frito-Lay, Aramark and Compass.

"We chose Hattie because of her extensive knowledge of the foodservice industry and her proven track record of creating and leading world class, customized executive leadership development programs," said Susan Gambardella, WFF board of directors chair and vice president, Global Account Team for Coca-Cola Refreshments. "Hattie shares our passion for preparing a pipeline of talent to increase gender representation in the executive ranks of foodservice companies from 15% to 30%."

Her vast experience with WFF includes serving as an executive consultant to the board, member of the board of directors for the past six years and interim CEO. As an executive consultant to WFF, she has provided business strategy and oversight related to risk assessment, revenue and operations, as well as spearheaded the creation and implementation of WFF's Global Diversity and Inclusion Initiative. In late 2013, she took on the role of WFF CEO, on an interim basis.

"I am honored to have the opportunity to lead such an exceptional organization that has a clear and focused mission of changing the face of leadership in the foodservice industry and making it the industry of choice for women seeking opportunity and career advancement," Hill said. "As we prepare for the next chapter in the organization's 25-year history, our goal is to help open more doors for the advancement of women and create better equity in the leadership ranks of this $683 billion industry."  

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