Tim Bauman: Fully Committed

Currently, the Meal Maps and Menu Markers program is 60% implemented; Bauman hopes to have the program completely in place this summer.

Meal Maps and Menu Markers is just one component to the hospital’s commitment to better employee health. All employees who are on the hospital’s insurance plan have been biometrically screened, and once that data is analyzed, Bauman will have aggregate data on things like employees’ cholesterol and blood sugar. He hopes to check those same levels after the Meal Maps and Menu Markers program has been in place for one year to see if the cafeteria program is making a difference in the employees’ health.

Meals on Wheels: The hospital’s Meals on Wheels (MOW) program is a rare example of a completely volunteer-run MOW program, Bauman says. As such, it was having problems finding people to fill vacant leadership spots. “Some of the chairmen were taking on too many duties and then when they would leave the job seemed too overwhelming for a new person,” he says. “That makes it hard to get volunteers when they don’t feel they will be able to fill all the expectations.” So last year Bauman decided to implement a volunteer succession plan to help fix the problem.

Along with the program’s new chairman, Bauman rewrote job descriptions for the program and provided proper training for the volunteers so they felt comfortable in their roles. Since making the changes, Bauman says the MOW program is fully staffed and commitment is once again strong. In August 2008, Bauman was inducted as a fellow of nutrition to the National Center for Nutrition Leadership, a Meals on Wheels Association of America educational and development group. Following the induction, the volunteer succession plan was made available to all MOW programs.

Even with all the projects Bauman already has on his plate, he is about to add yet another. In the next couple of years, the hospital, and foodservice department, will undergo a much needed expansion project. A new 50-bed tower is being built and Bauman says work on a redesigned kitchen and servery will break ground in late 2010. “The cafeteria was built when we didn’t think we would have more than 250 people on campus,” Bauman says. “Now, we have more than 1,000 people on campus. Seventy percent of the food produced in the kitchen is not eaten in the cafeteria, whereas in most hospitals that number is around 50%. So I need a big cafeteria built to accommodate all the people on campus.”

More From FoodService Director

Ideas and Innovation
aquaponics produce

We partnered with a student group interested in aquaponics to build a recirculating fish tank and lettuce growing operation in our Oval Dining Center. The large tanks are stocked with tilapia that live in the water and fertilize lettuce growing in the recirculating water under grow lights. We then harvest the lettuce and use it in our operations. The unit is set up in the dining room where customers can see the science in action, learn about the process and enjoy the fresh lettuce that was just picked.

Ideas and Innovation
fridge system

We installed a remote refrigeration system as part of our cafeteria renovation. The main part of the system is located on the roof and controls all our refrigerated equipment, including the walk-in freezer and coolers, beverage refrigerator, etc. The system allows us to identify problems faster, and the elimination of individual condenser units cuts down on A/C bills as well as noise.

Industry News & Opinion

Students at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor will be served student-grown produce from the campus farm at dining halls this fall, M Live reports.

The dining team received its first batch of produce from UM’s on-campus farm in June, after students received the proper USDA certification to grow, harvest and deliver food to campus dining halls. In order to figure out what produce is needed, students communicate with the dining department weekly, and Michigan Dining purchases items accordingly.

"The students are involved from seed to plate," Executive Chef Frank Turchan...

Sponsored Content
college students eating

From Ovention.

Today’s colleges and universities know they should offer more than a large selection of breakfast cereals in the morning and chicken tenders at lunch to appeal to students. When it comes to what’s trending on campuses, here’s a look at what directors can tune into to boost engagement.

1. Expanded dining hours

Late-night options have long been a popular fixture on college campuses, but if it’s too late, students often choose to venture to off-campus retailers to satisfy their cravings. According to Technomic’s 2017 College & University Consumer Trend...

FSD Resources