Raquel Frazier: Healthy's Hero

Beyond the café: In addition to changing the cafeteria’s menu, the department changed other retail and patient foodservice menus. “You have to make the change to healthy in all areas,” Frazier says. “If you don’t, then people will go to the vending machines and buy unhealthy items and they won’t come into the cafeteria where the healthy items are being sold, and that doesn’t help anyone.”

All catering and special event menus now follow the same nutritional guidelines as those in the cafeteria. The transition to healthy in the vending machines was significant. Frazier estimates that only 30% of the vending machines’ previous offerings fit the new healthy nutritional guidelines. So along with her vending company, Frazier phased out all of the unhealthy items and replaced them with healthier versions. Frazier says when the switch was made, sales from the vending machines dropped significantly at first. But she says after switching to more kid-friendly vending options, sales have begun to increase.

For patient menus, Frazier says only minor changes had to be made because most of the offerings on the patient menu already fit the guidelines. “Because we are a children’s hospital, a lot of the items that we use are grab-and-go, such as pizza, chicken fingers and hamburgers,” she says. “What I was able to do was to keep similar products but look for the healthier version. So with the pizza, we do items with whole-grain crust. We do an oat bran chicken finger. With our burgers we are able to incorporate turkey and chicken burgers. We still do french fries, but they are baked. If we do have an application where we have to fry something, we have a non-trans fat oil.”

Marketing: Frazier knew that some customers would be upset with the change to all-healthy offerings in the hospital, so she tried to pre-empt any ill feelings with a marketing campaign. The biggest part of that campaign was the Healthy Taste of La Rabida. For the event, Frazier invited her food vendors to showcase healthy products at the hospital, “so that my customers could see that although we were going 100% healthy, these items still taste good,” Frazier says. The event lasted all day and all hospital employees, patients and guests were invited to participate. There was a VIP showing one hour before the event began to allow patients to enjoy the samples.

Frazier also put up posters, banners and bulletin board displays throughout the hospital during the healthy initiative’s kick-off week to let customers know about the change and to laud the health benefits of the program.

During National Nutrition Month, educational programs are run in the cafeteria. “We showcase items so that people can see the healthy implications of food items,” Frazier says. “We pick an item, like iron, and when people buy an item with a high iron content they get a punch on their punch card. If people turn in their cards at the end of the week with all the food items punched they are entered into a contest to win a prize.” This year, the hospital selected calcium to showcase, and the food items that customers needed to purchase to complete their punch cards included yogurt, flax seeds and nuts.

Patient satisfaction: This year, the foodservice department was named the most improved department, following six consecutive months of 100% patient satisfaction scores. “Or goal in the department is to have 95% or higher in patient satisfaction,” Frazier says. “To have 100% for six months in a row is just unheard of in this industry. Without our patients we wouldn’t be here.”

Mark Renfree, the hospital’s CFO and vice president of administration, says that Frazier is deserving of the award. “Under Raquel’s leadership, a lot of innovative programs have been incorporated into the foodservice operation. Raquel is passionate about foodservice and she demonstrates that day in and day out. That passion is incorporated in special events, training her employees and being creative with the menu to offer a variety of healthy entrées that people have responded well to.”

One of the ways Frazier and her team of 16 FTEs have increased patient satisfaction is by implementing a test tray audit committee. The committee consists of Frazier, the risk manager, the infection control nurse, a nursing team leader and a clinical dietitian. Every month, the team audits a tray from two different diets. A fictitious patient is created and the trays are delivered as if to a real patient. The team tests the trays for temperature, quality and delivery service; i.e., was the server polite and did she follow proper sanitation procedures.

Another change Frazier made that increased patient satisfaction was tweaking the daily patient satisfaction survey. “I developed a survey that has incorporated smiley faces,” Frazier says. “So if I wanted to do a question on the temperature of the food, the faces would go from being hot to a face with earmuffs on and shivering. This way if a child is younger and they can’t read, they can show you what their food tasted like.”

More From FoodService Director

Sponsored Content
coffee senior living

From Keurig Green Mountain.

Healthcare foodservice represents the perfect environment for serving coffee. For the time-crunched staff, family and friends visiting patients, and seniors craving a treat, snack, or pick-me-up, coffee is considered a valuable amenity.

What’s more, purchasing beverages away from home is a popular habit. According to Technomic’s 2016 Beverage report, consumers average 3.6 drink purchases per week from foodservice outlets. And coffee is one of the most popular beverage options— Technomic’s 2016 Snacking Occasion report found 61% of consumers say...

Industry News & Opinion

South Valley Preparatory School in Albuquerque, N.M., has launched a range of healthy eating initiatives to combat obesity, the Albuquerque Journal reports.

The initiatives are in response to a State of Obesity report that stated that nearly a quarter of 10- to 17-year-olds in New Mexico were overweight or obese in 2016. The school banned junk food on campus during school hours for both students and staff, and offers healthy seasonal meals in its cafeteria. Students also take weekly trips to local farms to get an inside look at where their food comes from.

While the school...

Industry News & Opinion

Food delivery company Good Uncle is expanding to 15 college campuses this fall, The Daily Orange reports.

The company plans to grow along the East Coast and is looking at opening at schools such as George Washington University, Pennsylvania State University, Villanova University and American University. Good Uncle hopes to open at 50 to 100 campuses by 2019.

Starting as a delivery-only kitchen in 2016, Good Uncle partners with local restaurants to recreate their popular dishes and then deliver them to college students. The company offers free delivery, no delivery minimum...

Ideas and Innovation
wahoo tacos

School lunch is heating up. As expectations rise in the noncommercial sector, the old-fashioned cafeteria has become a hot topic. Political pressure on schools has seesawed over the past eight years, and nutritional regulations on items like sodium and whole grains have been overhauled (and back again). Meanwhile, students, parents, teachers, administrators and policymakers are demanding more healthfulness and better taste from school meals, often for the same cost.

Yet the industry’s best are dedicated to getting better, even while looking to the future with caution. “There’s not...

FSD Resources