Joie Schoonover: The Real Deal

Joie Schoonover uses her skills and sincerity to get results at Wisconsin-Madison.

Accomplishments

Joie Schoonover has transformed dining services at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, by:  

  • Spearheading the construction and opening of two major facilities, both of which opened this year, while simultaneously working on three more construction projects  
  • Changing the department’s foodservice systems to adapt to the needs of the department’s new operations
  • Leading a major staff restructuring, which decreased the number of layers of people between Schoonover and her managers
  • Improving purchasing practices by combining vendor contracts and implementing a cycle menu, which helped forecast ordering more accurately

Revising systems: Schoonover hasn’t just been busy building. Many other operational changes had to be made to aid in the transition to these new facilities.
“First, we changed our inventory methods,” Schoonover says. “We now take a weekly inventory versus monthly. We’re also more accurate in counting everything during inventory. If you count things correctly, then you are not over-ordering or wasting food.”

The department also started using forecast-based purchasing. Schoonover says that was only possible because the department implemented a cycle menu, allowing it to forecast orders more accurately.

“When you don’t have [a cycle menu], you don’t have a purchasing history to compare to,” Schoonover says. “That makes it really difficult to place accurate orders. We used to place orders 10 days in advance. I’ve been doing this a long time and I had never heard of placing orders 10 days out, so I knew that had to change. We were able to reduce that time to ordering today for tomorrow. Some items have to be ordered two days in advance. But by using the cycle menu forecast and working with our prime vendor’s online warehouse, we were able to reduce the amount of time our managers spent on ordering.”

Entering into a new prime vendor contract also helped streamline purchasing. Schoonover says the department used to have a lot of contracts aside from the prime vendor agreement. Some of those were combined into the prime vendor contract. Another time-saving switch: hiring an outside vendor to select the product mix for the campus c-stores. Because this vendor’s primary focus is c-stores, it can do a product plan for the department.

Other changes included moving to cook-chill preparation for items like soups, taco meat and pasta sauce, which allows the department to offer a wider variety of menu options.

“When I got here the staff just didn’t know any different,” Schoonover says. “I have a lot of longevity in my staff. They knew things needed to be different, but they didn’t know how to fix it. We’ve been able to fix those things, and it’s made our department more efficient.”

As a result of these system changes, the department was able to avoid an overall price increase for four years. The dining plan is à la carte with a membership fee, which Schoonover says basically covers overhead costs. While the overhead price has increased in the past four years, the department hasn’t done a blanket price increase. 

Staff structure: When Schoonover came to Wisconsin in 2008—after stints at the University of Iowa, the University of Missouri, Knox College and University of Wisconsin, Platteville—she noticed there were a lot of layers in the department’s management structure, which didn’t jibe with her management style.

“I’m definitely not a hierarchical manager,” Schoonover says. “I brought in Julaine [Kiehn] and Jim Korner as consultants and we interviewed the management team to develop a new structure that would make sense for these new buildings. At one point, if you went from an assistant manager to me [there were] like six layers. Now it’s assistant manger, unit manager and me.”

As part of the process, the managers talked with the HR director and Schoonover, which gave them the opportunity to tell upper management what they’d like to be doing and where.  

“We were able to move people where it made the most sense,” Schoonover says. “The full-time staff had the opportunity to tell us—if their position was going to exist in the new structure—if they wanted to stay where they were. If their position didn’t exist in the new structure, they could interview for a different position equal to their level or apply as a candidate for promotion. Now we have more managers out on the floor. There were previously 120 positions including managers—now there are 136.”  

Brad Krakow, project manager for The CBORD Group, Inc., who worked with Schoonover on improving the department’s ordering process and menu forecasting, says the transformation that Schoonover has managed during her tenure is staggering.

“Reorganizing her entire professional staffing structure is just [one] multi-year Joie-driven initiative that she supported with both internal and external expertise,” Krakow says. “She presented and sold a vision of professionalism and an outcome of excellence and did not let it go. All of Joie’s efforts represent careers for some foodservice directors. Joie is just getting started.”

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