Jeff Shaffer: Creating confidence

Jeff Shaffer's trust in his employees fosters innovation at Reed Smith.

By Lindsey Ramsey, Contributing Editor

Accomplishments

Jeff Shaffer has improved the foodservice at Reed Smith by:

  • fostering a work environment that encourages trust between team members
  • creating and maintaining a rooftop terrace garden, which provides the café with fresh produce during the summer months
  • implementing a comprehensive home meal replacement program, where customers place orders at lunch to pick up take away dinners
  • introducing new concepts quarterly for the café's rotating station, which has helped increase revenue by 8.9%

Jeff Shaffer believes in the power of leading by example. As executive chef for Parkhurst Dining Services at Reed Smith in Pittsburgh, Shaffer manages day-to-day operations, finances, menu planning and customer relations for the 373-employee location. Although his title is executive chef, the director of dining at the location reports to him. Tim Fetter, executive chef for Parkhurst at Highmark Pittsburgh, which is located in the same complex as Reed Smith, says Shaffer’s vision, skill level and his willingness to work directly with his team have made him a successful director.

“He is very hands-on and he leads by example,” Fetter says. “He is very skilled in the kitchen and has a great vision all around, so his subordinates can trust his judgment and guidance with just about any situation. I have helped Jeff at his location and have always been impressed with the creativity and quality of his menus. The quality that he and his team produce is second to none. When that is the case, it always starts at the top. He really embodies the vision and mission of our company, which is ultimately great food and great guest service—two things in which he excels.”

Building trust: A big part of Shaffer’s management philosophy is establishing trust with his staff.

“You have to trust the people who work for you,” Shaffer says. “If you can’t trust them to do a good job and trust that they are going to treat the food and the guest as if it’s their own food to their friends and family, you really are starting off on the wrong foot. But you can’t just blindly trust them. You work with them and train them to build a trust with them. You know that your staff is going to take all that training and time you spend with them and really develop, grow and get pride out of what they are doing.

“You can’t be that manager or chef of how I came up where you always had that chef yelling at you and throwing plates. That just doesn’t work anymore. It’s not the way to get the best out of your people. Treat them with the respect they deserve on a basic human level. Show them how you want them to act, not by saying you need to act more like me but just by being proud in what you do and taking the time to give them attention.”

As a result of the trust Shaffer has built with his team, he’s been able to implement several new initiatives.

Rooftop garden: One of the initiatives that Shaffer is most proud of is the rooftop terrace garden he planted on the 13th floor of Reed Smith’s LEED-certified building.

“I grow tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers and herbs that we use in the café,” Shaffer says. “This is our second season. We expanded it this year to include additional varieties of tomatoes. We also added the cucumbers, additional herbs and citrus trees, including a banana tree, this year. I don’t know how many chefs are growing their own bananas here in Pittsburgh, but I’m trying.”

Shaffer says the biggest challenge with the garden is the fact that it is on the building’s 13th floor.

“We’re in a plaza and unfortunately we are surrounded by other buildings that don’t allow for a lot of direct sunlight, so our harvest tends to be a little later,” Shaffer says. “Just being 13 stories up in the air and having to get compost and everything delivered that high is a challenge. Last year I was producing enough tomatoes to menu tomatoes from the garden exclusively on the deli for a couple days. I would say our total harvest throughout the entire season is maybe about 30 or 40 pounds of tomatoes. Peppers didn’t do very well last year, but we get enough basil, parsley, rosemary and other herbs to sustain us throughout the season. I don’t know what to expect out of the cucumbers this year since it’s the first time we’ve had them. I hope we’ll get enough to have pickles throughout the season.”

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