David Sauers: Nailing Emory

Since it's to be a joint project, Sauers has been part of an ongoing dialogue with library staff from his first day on campus. The café will be located close to the main library entrance and down one level, with seating for 55 to 65 customers. Presently, there's a Jazzmans kiosk located in the Business School and a co-branded Subconnection/ Jazzmans Café in the Rollins School of Public Health, but the new installation is expected to be busiest during late afternoons, evenings and through the wee hours of the morning.

There's an existing operation in the library that's open 24 hours Sunday through Friday, and 3 p.m. to midnight on Saturdays, so the new Jazzmans' extended hours can be viewed as an additional amenity. "This will be a new location for about eight to 12 of our staff to cover," Sauers says. "We see a real need to provide late-night service and social opportunities—and we stand the chance of being very successful."

Double the revenues: And success is what he sees so far, especially in two critical locations on campus—the DUC, and Dooley's at the Depot. "We've come close to doubling the revenues [compared to prior years]," Sauer points out. "Based on what I know, we're on track to double revenues in the DUC, and I think the branding with Einstein Bagel Brothers is part of that."

Dooley's at The Depot is a 24-hour location that's freestanding and looks like a train station out by the tracks, Sauers explains (in fact, that's its history). "Now it has an updated sound system and plasma TV and there's an outside deck—the whole place has a kind of lived-in feel."

Another operation, Caffe Antico, is a full-service fine dining restaurant that's filled to capacity each day. Located in the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Art, there's seating for 40 as well as take-out business. The question prior to pursuing that business was: Would Sauers and his staff be able to support and improve it? Now, the team is on the museum's preferred caterer list.

"The Carlos Museum has the potential to become a very busy catering location," he says. "We've kept a lot of menu items that were previously well-received—such as cheeseburgers and homemade salad dressings—and added new items such as rosemary-scented eggplant sandwich on a fresh ciabatta roll. Some food is transported from Cox Hall [site of the branded foodcourt] while soups and sandwiches are prepared at the museum in its very small finishing kitchen."

Brand power: Most of Emory's catering comes out of the Cox Hall kitchen, but a solid portion of it also comes from the Einstein Bagel Shop and from Jazzmans, especially coffee and bakery items. Sauers, drawing upon his marketing experience, underscores the additional options available thanks to these retail locations and he takes every opportunity to leverage the power of the brands. He finds that catering offers the chance to showcase services with consistently good high-end functions.

"Our catering director, Kathy Lambui—a NACUFS Loyal E. Horton award winner last year—and three executive chefs on campus including one dedicated to catering, along with two catering managers, handle the substantial business," he explains. "All our campus foodservice staff are cross-trained and we cross over and help out all the time. We're fortunate we don't have to rely on an outside service for help."

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