Brent Craig: Communicating change

Brent Craig has opened the lines of dialogue at Douglas County Schools.

Spreading the news: After reworking the menus, the next step was getting the word out to parents and students about the department’s efforts. Craig created a nutrition services Facebook page to share news and information. On the page he also interacts with parents. Craig or a member of his department answers parent questions and starts conversations with the site’s visitors by asking them questions, such as what did you eat for breakfast? Craig says the Facebook page has been a great way to help change negative perceptions about the program, which Craig says have been a longstanding problem in the district. [To learn more about the Facebook page, read the May cover story “Making social media work.”]

“We have some moms who get together and they each take a day and they bring in lunch from places like Jason’s Deli or they have a personal chef come in and do a special lunch for these kids,” Craig says. “We have a group of parents who have partnered with Whole Foods to bring in high-end boxed lunches that cost like $7 or $8. Whole Foods delivers food to these schools. It’s sort of their effort to run out the school lunch program because they have no faith that the school lunch program can be healthy. We probably have 10% to 15% of our families that will only eat organic or whole foods. There are some people who just won’t eat school food. It’s a challenge I never thought I would have to deal with.”

Craig says that, for the most part, the parents who have the negative opinions about his program simply don’t know about the changes that have been made. “When people learn the good things we’re doing they have a different attitude,” he adds.

Reaching the students was next. After seeing positive student reaction to culinary events by local chefs in collaboration with Chefs Move to Schools, Craig created For Kids, By Kids, a program that seeks student input. “We are finding that kids like to get involved in creating and having a say as to what their world is about,” Craig says.

At the middle schools For Kids, By Kids started with two area chefs coming into the schools to work with health classes to develop a line of trail mixes and granola that are then prepared and sold in the cafeteria. Craig says this program is how he has continued to sell à la carte items. “We’re going to continue the à la carte, but with the kids helping to design what they think would be good snacks,” he adds. Craig says schools are developing items that will make up the snack menu.

The ProStart class at the high school also got involved with For Kids, By Kids. The class, in collaboration with Chefs Move to Schools, took a cheese Big Daddy’s pizza and developed seven specialty pizzas. The pizzas were taste tested by fellow students and sold in some schools. The pizzas also played a role in the revamp of the high school lunch program.

Open and closed: Last school year the high school campuses were opened for lunch for the first time in 50 years. Craig says he expected the move to be a financial “disaster” for the department. “We expected to lose about 30% to 35% of revenue when they opened the high schools,” he says. Craig knew he had to come up with a way to keep the students on campus and participating in the meal program. He did this by replicating what the students would find at off-campus dining options.

Craig opened a Subway franchise at each of the nine high schools. “We own the franchises,” he says. “We bake the bread and we make the sandwiches right there in front of them like if they were having a commercial Subway experience.” He also opened up Berry Blendz, a franchise much like a Jamba Juice, which has been popular with students.

Pizza was another item that was changed. The high schools had been selling Domino’s pizza, but after the success of the ProStart specialty pizzas, Craig began selling those pizzas instead of Domino’s pizza in three high schools. “We bake the pizzas off and cut them right in front of our students to give them a pizzeria feel,” Craig says. “Plus, the students are developing the pizzas. There is great power in something that is kid tested and kid approved because the item seems to be more acceptable and the kids have faith in that.” The Buffalo chicken and vegetarian with balsamic glaze are two favorites.

“We try really hard to make [the high school cafeteria] like a mall food court type of experience,” Craig says.

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