Amy Beckstrom: Creating Community

“With so much change happening within dining, her ability to give us her vision and then stepping back and allowing those tasked with the job to get it done was ideal,” Paterson says. “Amy encourages those around her to do their best and continue to raise the bar in their respected areas so that as a whole, dining services is the winner.”

Since opening the new C4C Dining Center, Beckstrom says the department has seen an amazing positive financial impact. From the building’s opening in August 2010 to October Campus Cash (flexible spending dollars) revenue has increased 140% in six weeks, and the total new revenue increased 138%.  Beckstrom says those increases indicate that more faculty and staff are enjoying meals in the dining centers.

Sustainable dining: Another big effort for Beckstrom has been sustainability.

“This is Boulder,” Beckstrom says. “So the expectations for sustainability are high and we like that. Last year, I recognized that people want to know what we’re doing in terms of sustainability. I created a position called coordinator for sustainable dining. Her job is to work with the units within housing and dining, along with the rest of campus, to facilitate what we’re doing, what we aren’t doing and what we should do.”

The department also has had a little help when implementing sustainable initiatives. For the last few years, dining services has worked with a class called Campus and the Biosphere that researched the best way to implement initiatives regarding the environmental impact of dining operations.

“A few years ago water bottle waste was becoming a big concern, and we were opening new grab-and-go locations,” Beckstrom says. “The class was concerned because all these locations created a whole other waste stream. In 2008, we were approaching 1 million bottles a year, so we put in these water stations outside of all the grab-and-go locations and dorms to encourage the students not to take bottled water. As a result, our bottled water usage has been reduced by 85% in two years.”

The department also made a big impact in reducing plastic bag usage in grab and go. Beckstrom says previously the department was using more than 600,000 plastic bags in those operations.

FoodService Director - FSD month - Amy Beckstrom - UC Boulder

“We decided to eliminate plastic bags entirely from our grab-and-go operations and we did it and did not receive a single complaint,” Beckstrom says. “This demonstrates that students can be very supportive of these types of initiatives, as long as we communicate the positive impact they are making on the environment.”

The new building also allowed for improvement to composting. The building is setup so no one has to touch the compost. The department composts both pre- and post-consumer waste and diverts more than 200 tons of food waste from the landfills per year.

Beckstrom also considers the department’s efforts with local and organics part of sustainable dining.

“We established goals in terms of local, natural, organic products,” Beckstrom says. “Currently, we serve about 10% organic, 15% natural—which we define as minimally processed—and 15% local. The goal is to serve 25% for all three by 2015.”

Team player: Beckstrom worked in school foodservice for 16 years, and it was there that she developed her team-oriented approach. This approach led her to spearhead a revamp of the employee evaluation program, now called Peak Performers.

Beckstrom says the previous program was based on whichever employee got the most recognition slips.

FoodService Director - FSD month - Amy Beckstrom - UC Boulder

“The new program changed the system to where the employees get recognized for good attendance, supporting their peers and providing training,” Beckstrom says. “Each month we recognize our employees and each year we have an annual celebration and the winner receives $500. Instead of slips the managers get together and nominate someone.”

Kambiz Khalili, executive director of Housing and Dining Services, says Beckstrom’s supportive nature makes her a great leader.

“She runs a fiscally sound program and understands the importance of MBWA [management by walking around],” Khalili says. “She is a cheerleader when things are tough and doesn’t hesitate assist staff. You cannot find someone more enthusiastic about her profession than Amy.”

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