Confessions

Operators open up about their passions, fears and embarrassing moments
By 
Katie Fanuko, Associate Editor

Deborah Harris and Patti Giuffre, both sociology professors at Texas State University, in San Marcos, Texas, confronted the challenges female chefs face.

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Harry Dorofee, foodservice director for Flik International Corp. at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton in New York, would love to meet Steve Jobs, prefers IMAX and hates rollercoasters.

Byron Sackett, child nutrition director at Lincoln County Schools in Lincolnton, N.C., wishes flavored, upscale coffees had never been created and would be a tomato farmer if he weren’t feeding children.

Larry Bates, director of dining services for Riddle Village in Media, Pa., would be in law enforcement if he weren’t in foodservice and doesn’t understand the hype around sustainability. 

Ginne Dunleavy, director of dining at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, R.I., wishes she could sing, hates finding a parking space and keeps some telling ingredients in her fridge.

J. Michael Floyd, executive director of food services at the University of Georgia, in Athens, loves cheesecake, thinks trayless is overrated and wants to meet John Muir.

Cyndi Roberts, manger of food services at St. Joseph Memorial Hospital in Murphysboro, Ill., wants to travel the world but wouldn’t go back in time if given the opportunity.

Salvatore Cantalupo, corporate chef for Stamford, Conn.-based Corporate Image Dining Services, dreams of seeing all of Italy, loves Chimay beer and doesn’t understand Atkins.

Linda Stoll, executive director of food services for Jeffco Public Schools, hates mornings but gets up early, wants to be a Southern belle and loves Mexican food. 

Ricky Clark loves banana pudding, hates politics and considers himself an old hippie.

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