Confessions of Timothy Cipriano

Timothy Cipriano, executive director of food services at 20,800-student New Haven Public Schools in Connecticut, wants to play baseball but would never go skydiving.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

Making a difference in the life of a child.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Seeing firsthand the largest affect of the hunger problem in our country—hungry kids.

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Being invited by the White House to work on Chefs Move to Schools.

Q. What is the most unusual foodservice/catering request you have ever received?

Nothing crazy. We received a request when I first started to set up a large catering event and they asked us to donate everything.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

I would love to be able to actually play baseball, instead of striking out at the plate! I am a competitive guy, so striking out and I do not get along.

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

Already did. I started eating right and working out. Lost almost 100 pounds and I feel great!

Q. What is your greatest fear?

I don’t know if it is a fear, but I would never jump out of a perfectly good airplane just because I could.

Q. Which living person do you most admire?

My wife, for putting up with me!

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

A good burger, preferably grass-fed beef with local cheese on a brioche roll. Truffle fries too!

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?

Cherry peppers stuffed with prosciutto and cheese; my kids love them too.

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

Atkins Diet. Can you imagine living without bread and pasta?

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

Woodchuck in Russia, horse in Switzerland and calves lungs in Austria.

Q. What do you consider to be the most overrated foodservice trend?

“Healthy” junk food. Just because it has whole grains, fiber, agave syrup and contains no high-fructose corn syrup does not mean it is healthy.

Q. What are your words to live by?

Go big or go home!

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