Confessions of Ruth Arnold

Ruth Arnold thinks fondue is overrated and loves pickles.
Ruth Arnold, operations manager for Nutri-Serve Food Management Inc., in Burlington, N.J., wants to ride in a hot air balloon and says you’d find her dealing cards at a casino if she weren’t in foodservice.  

Q. What is the best part of your job?

Knowing that I am making a difference in kids’ lives.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Too much paperwork for the constantly changing rules and regulations. It takes me away from the kids.

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Becoming a mother and adopting my beautiful daughter.

Q. What is the most unusual foodservice/catering request you have ever received?

Serve miso soup to the students.

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

I’d most likely return to dealing table games in a casino.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

Rock star.

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

I’d worry less.

Q. What is your favorite meal?

Chicken parmigiana.  

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

Watching “My Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding” on TV.

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?

Pickles–homemade from produce grown in our garden.

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

GMO food. You shouldn’t mess with Mother Nature.

Q. What do you consider to be the most overrated foodservice trend?

Fondue restaurants.

Q. What are your words to live by?

If it’s not fun, why do it?

Q. If you had a time machine, what historical event or era would you visit?

The sixties. I am a peace and love kinda girl. 

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

George Harrison.

Q. What activity is at the top of your bucket list?

Hot air balloon ride. 

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