Confessions of Mary Molt

K-State's Mary Molt wishes she could eat whatever she wants without consequences.
Mary Molt is claustrophobic, loves interacting with college students and “still thinks the bacon and ice cream thing is weird.”

Q. What is the best part of your job?

The opportunity to interact daily with college students. Their optimism, enthusiasm, and ambition to make a difference makes every day a new and uplifting day.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Dealing with human resource issues.

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Advancing the fine reputation our dining services department enjoys both with students living in the residence halls and our university colleagues.

Q. What is the most unusual foodservice/catering request you have ever received?

Not long ago a summer conference group wanted to have a parking lot food fight to raise awareness of some humanitarian cause and asked dining services to provide the food to throw. We declined the request and the event was cancelled.

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

My fallback career, had I not received a dietetic internship, was to go to dental school. If forced to change careers today, however, I would become a kindergarten teacher.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

I wish I were more musical. I would like to sit down at a piano and play something other than a few notes from Ballad of the Green Beret. 

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

I would like to be able to eat anything I want without any weight or health consequences. Not going to happen, unfortunately.

Q. What is your greatest fear?

I am claustrophobic and fear being in tight or confined spaces without being able to breathe or escape.

Q. Which living person do you most admire?

We have a phenomenal priest at our Catholic student center that I admire.  Father Weber is a generous and selfless person who works long days, seven days a week, to make sure students see, hear and experience a value system that will undoubtedly help make them successful in their careers.  His commitment to student success is admirable.

Q. What is your favorite meal?

An older friend of mine, when asked this question, would answer, “whatever I am eating.” I rather feel the same way because there are so many wonderful foods, all equal in goodness. There are times in the fall when a meal of nice artisanal made olive bread, Maytag blue cheese, thinly sliced Jonathan apples and a lovely glass of red wine is heavenly.  My sister’s sauerkraut, potato dumplings, and pork dish is special, as is my brother’s chicken fried steak. Grilled rib eye steak from Munson Angus Farms (local) is unmatched. My nephew-in-law raises and sells lamb that is more than wonderful. Moreover, how could I not have halibut at the top of my favorite meal list? It is impossible to choose a favorite!    

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

Freshly baked artisan bread spread with soft unsalted butter or maybe some Maytag blue cheese.

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?

Something that needs to be eaten or tossed.

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

It seems that what appears weird today is mainstream tomorrow. I still think the bacon and ice cream thing is weird.

Q. What are your words to live by?

For you and those you work with, make today better than yesterday and tomorrow better than today.

Q. If you had a time machine what historical event or era would you visit?

Next year Kansas State celebrates their sesquicentennial (150 year birthday). I would like to visit our dining services after another 150 years.

Q. What would be your dream vacation?

I would like to spend a year traveling to several historic and/or beautiful places, staying a while in each with no agenda and having time to walk, read, relax, bask in the splendor, and experience all the wonderful foods of the region.   

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

Warren Buffett.

Q. Who is your favorite celebrity chef?

A tossup between Ellie Krieger and Ina Garten.

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