Confessions of Linda Stoll

Linda Stoll admires Oprah, wishes people appreciated her singing and loves a good burrito and margarita.
Linda Stoll, executive director of foodservice at 85,000-student Jeffco Public Schools in Golden, Colo., admires Oprah, wishes people appreciated her singing and loves a good burrito and margarita.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

It’s different every single day.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Dealing with all the rules and regulations. It sometimes feels like they get in the way of what common sense says is best for kids.

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

We solved the competitive foods issue. We have taken over all student stores and worked out profit sharing.

Q. What is the most unusual foodservice/catering request you have ever received?

During focus groups about 70% of the kids asked for sushi, which was surprising.

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

Lying on a beach. Or be an interior designer.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

Singing. I sing all the time, but no one appreciates me.

Q. What is your greatest fear?

Spiders. Or if I realized I had done something to cause harm to someone else.

Q. Which living person do you most admire?

Oprah. She’s had a big impact on a lot of people.

Q. What is your favorite meal?

Mexican food—a bean burrito with a good margarita.

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

Barbecue potato chips.

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?

Milk; I’m a milk freak.

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

Organic fruits and veggies.

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

When we were kids, we visited our relatives and would go to gourmet grocery stores and get weird things like chocolate covered ants.

Q. What do you consider to be the most overrated foodservice trend?

Self-serve salad bars. I think you can offer fresh fruits and veggies without worrying about safety.

Q. What are your words to live by?

That was then; this is now.

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