Confessions of Linda Stoll

Jeffco Schools' Linda Stoll hates organics and wants to island hop.
Linda Stoll, executive director of food services for Jeffco Public Schools, hates mornings but gets up early, wants to be a Southern belle and loves Mexican food. 

Q. What is the best part of your job?

I get to do something different every single day—no two days are ever the same.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Mornings! I have never been a real morning person and, yet, I begin my day at 4:30!  

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

I have raised three beautiful, happy, successful well-adjusted children who now have real jobs and can support themselves.

Q. What is the most unusual foodservice/catering request you have ever received?

I spent 21 years in Alaska and had one of my very remote schools call me and ask if they could accept a moose as a donation that had been killed by the train.

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

Lying on a beach, holding a drink with an umbrella.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

I wish I could sing well. I serenade my staff at work, and they just do not appreciate my attempts.

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

I would love to have some sort of athletic ability.

Q. What is your greatest fear?

That I will not be able to meet the expectations of those who love me.

Q. Which living person do you most admire?

Bill Cosby

Q. What is your favorite meal?

Anything Mexican.

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

I treat myself to massages at least a couple of times each month.

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?


Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?


Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

Chocolate covered ants – homemade! I was about eight and my cousin and I made them after we saw some in a grocery store.

Q. What do you consider to be the most overrated foodservice trend?


Q. Read the book or see the movie?

Always read the book.

Q. Are you a morning or evening person?

Actually neither, I kind of glitter around noon!

Q. What are your words to live by?

That was then, this is now.

Q. If you had a time machine what historical event or era would you visit?

Probably the pre-Civil War South. I just know that I was truly meant to be a Southern belle!

Q. What do you value most in a friend?

Acceptance, liking me for exactly who I am.

Q. What would be your dream vacation?

Several months hopping from island to island in the Caribbean.

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

Martha Stewart. Can anyone really be that gracious?

Q. What is your most treasured possession?

My family. Everything else is just “stuff.”

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

Organics: Are you seeing a trend here?

Q. What activity is at the top of your bucket list?

Attending an Andrea Bocelli concert in his hometown in Tuscany.

Q. Who is your favorite celebrity chef?

Rachael Ray.

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