Confessions of Kris Schroeder

Swedish Medical Center's Kris Schroeder doesn't understand blue foods.
Kris Schroeder,  administrative director of support services for the Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, and the first president of AHF, would love to add a few inches to her height and admits to a hesitation with blue-colored foods.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

Every day is an adventure! I work with several amazing teams that all appreciate adventure just as much as I do… at least most of the time.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

The need to prioritize and not being able to engage in all the creative initiatives my teams imagine.

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Leading teams to create new business models and mentoring others. The number of miles walked and mountains climbed. Honors from peers such as the Ivy Award and the Silver Plate.

Q. What is the most unusual foodservice/catering request you have ever received?

A customer wanted a custom-decorated cookie personalized for each member of his department.

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

I’d really love to be a motivational speaker.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

Baking artisan breads in an outdoor wood-burning oven.

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

That’s easy, I’d be taller!

Q. What is your greatest fear?

I fear not, except in extreme weather on glaciers.

Q. What is your favorite meal?

Thanksgiving dinner outdoors with friends. Everyone contributes something. We smoke the turkey, use cast-iron Dutch ovens and stay warm by the fire.

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

I never understood the attraction to blue food—Jell-O, beverages, etc.

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?


Q. Read the book or see the movie?

Read the book. I come from a long line of librarians and writers. Too bad I didn’t inherit the writing talent.

Q. What are your words to live by?

Always be optimistic. What you think about, you bring about, so bring all good things to you and yours.

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