Confessions of Karen Green

Karen Green, school nutrition director at Thomas County Schools, Thomasville, Ga., shows her Southern pride with her love of grits and Paula Deen.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

Getting hugs from the students.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Having to release an employee.

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Giving birth to my four beautiful daughters.

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

Teaching home economics in the classroom.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

To be able to sing or play the piano.

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

Not to open mouth, insert foot at certain times.

Q. What is your greatest fear?

Being held under the water or being closed in.

Q. Which living person do you most admire?

My husband because of the example that he sets for me every day. He is a compassionate, humble, hard-working man, always thinking of others. 

Q. What is your favorite meal?

Breakfast! My mother taught me that breakfast was the most important meal of the day. After 24 years in schools, I have seen the differences in children who eat breakfast and ones who do not.

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

Shopping—my closet is full. I also love dessert.

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?

Outdated milk; sorry, I should drink more.

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

Hamburgers and french fries because of the fast food, high calories and eating on the run, without physical activity that often goes with it.

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

Sushi. We southern girls love grits!

Q. What do you consider to be the most overrated foodservice trend?

À la carte.

Q. What are your words to live by?

As my grandmother used to preach to us, “pretty is as pretty does.”

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

Risley Dining Room at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., has just become 100 percent gluten-free, 14850.com reports.

For the past two years, the university has slowly phased out gluten in the dining hall’s menu by eliminating it in its stir fries, biscuits and brownies.

Instead of offering gluten-free versions of typical college fare, including pizza and pasta, the dining service team aimed for more sophisticated restaurant-style items.

Along with being gluten-free, Risley is also peanut free and tree-nut free.

The dining room is the second college eatery...

Industry News & Opinion

James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., recently hosted a weeklong program called Weigh the Waste, which aimed to show students how much food gets wasted in dining halls, The Breeze reports.

Throughout the week, students placed food they were about to throw away on a scale located near the trash bins at one of their dining halls. At the end of the week, the school tallied the waste and saw that 817 pounds of food had been wasted.

School officials hope that the annual program, which it’s hosted since 2015, will remind dining hall patrons to only take as much food as...

Industry News & Opinion

The University of Maryland will begin offering weekly specials at all of its dining halls this semester, The Diamond Back reports.

The weekday specials will allow Dining Services to offer past menu items that students miss as well as new dishes students have been requesting, according to a spokesperson.

Students can find out which specials are being offered each week via dining hall table tents as well as through Dining Services’ social media. During select weeks, the specials may reflect a particular theme, such as Taste of the South.

Read the full story via...

Ideas and Innovation
university michigan hat coffee cookies

When it comes to fostering engagement in sustainability efforts, you can step up and do the work, or wait for it to happen to you, says Keith Soster, director of sustainability and student engagement for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Here’s a look at Soster’s job description, and how the position has redefined the program.

Q: How did your position come to be?

A: Before Michigan Dining went through a reorganization, requests for student and community partnerships went to whoever could be reached. They wanted someone to be the face of student and community connections—...

FSD Resources