Confessions of Cyndi Roberts

Cyndi Roberts looks toward the future, wants to go to Italy and hates supersizing.
Cyndi Roberts, manger of food services at St. Joseph Memorial Hospital in Murphysboro, Ill., wants to travel the world but wouldn’t go back in time if given the opportunity.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

The day-to-day challenges that keep my brain engaged and give me an opportunity to grow. 

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

The challenges that keep my brain in agony. 

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

A tour guide accruing frequent flier miles, or a personal trainer who traveled with my clients. 

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

I might not be quite as outspoken. Nah, that wouldn’t be me at all! 

Q. What is your favorite meal?

The meal isn’t as important as who you are dining with and the connection you have. 

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

This fruit in Peru with a hard shell and a gloppy mess of seeds and mucous-like stuff inside.

Q. What do you consider to be the most overrated foodservice trend?

Supersizing has been awful. 

Q. What are your words to live by?

Practice integrity, support the people in your life, take time to enjoy special moments, don’t live with regrets.

Q. What do you value most in a friend?

Support, integrity and the ability to have a great time no matter what. 

Q. Who is your favorite celebrity chef?

Bobby Flay. He’s kinda cocky, like me.

Q. What activity is at the top of your bucket list?

Travel: Rome is it, or maybe a Nile cruise?

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

My father. He passed away in 2000.

Q. What would be your dream vacation?

Italy, with a handsome Italian tour guide, and fine Italian food and wine.

Q. If you had a time machine what historical event or era would you visit?

I’m not sure I’d go back in time. It’s all about the future, baby!

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