Confessions of Charles Anderson

Clark County's Charles Anderson admires Wounded Warriors and can't resist desserts.
Charles Anderson, director of foodservice for the Clark County, Nev., School District, enjoys fly fishing at Yellowstone National Park, loves Texas Chicken Fried Steak and wishes he were a scratch golfer.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

Working with such a professional and efficient group of dedicated folks. 

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

Not being able to complete all tasks in a timely fashion.

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Leading United States troops in combat.

Q. What is the most unusual foodservice/catering request you have ever received?

Delivering beer, water and ammunition to troops in combat via helicopter.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

Scratch golfer.

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

Maintain my youthful weight.

Q. What is your greatest fear?

Failure.

Q. Which living person do you most admire?

Wounded Warriors and those who honor them.

Q. What is your favorite meal?

Texas Chicken Fried Steak.

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

Desserts.

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?

Milk.

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

Doesn’t matter. New ones come and go based upon tastes, cultures, and economics. Nothing better than Mom’s, though.

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

Something Vietnamese at a formal village feast.

Q. What are your words to live by?

Loyalty, efficiency, dedication to support duty, honor, country!

Q. What activity is at the top of your bucket list?

 Play golf at Pebble Beach.

Q. What is your dream vacation?

 Fly fishing/animal observing at Yellowstone and Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Q. If you had a time machine, what historical event or era would you visit?

Williamsburg, Va., in the run-up years to the Revolutionary War.

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

Ronald Reagan.

Q. Who is your favorite celebrity chef?

In Las Vegas, it is hard to pick. I guess whichever one’s restaurant I am in that evening.

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