Confessions of Byron Sackett

Byron Sackett wishes he could dine with Steve Jobs and loves Mountain Dew.
Byron Sackett, child nutrition director at Lincoln County Schools in Lincolnton, N.C., wishes flavored, upscale coffees had never been created and would be a tomato farmer if he weren’t feeding children.

Q. What is the best part of your job?

Being able to help children. Giving them healthy meals to help the education process.

Q. What is the worst part of your job?

The red tape at the federal level. 

Q. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Giving back to the community that was so good to me. 

Q. If you weren't in foodservice what would you be doing?

A tomato farmer in Florida. My grandpa was one of the biggest tomato farmers in the state.

Q. Which talent would you most like to have?

Athletic talents. I see the way kids look up to athletes and that could help me make even more of an impact with kids.

Q. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

To be 21 again, knowing what I know today. 

Q. What is your greatest fear?

Letting people down.

Q. What is your "guilty pleasure?"

Anything with white chocolate. 

Q. What will people always find in your refrigerator?

Fresh fruit and Diet Mountain Dew.

Q. What food fad do you wish had never started?

Flavored, upscale coffees. 

Q. What is the weirdest food you have ever eaten?

Kangaroo. 

Q. What are your words to live by?

Never be afraid to hire someone smarter than you. If you don’t you won’t learn more than you know today. 

Q. If you had a time machine what historical event or era would you visit?

The signing of the Declaration of Independence. 

Q. If you could eat dinner with anyone living or dead, who would it be?

Steve Jobs. In three decades his importance on society will be what Thomas Edison’s was.

Q. What activity is at the top of your bucket list?

Walking the Great Wall of China. 

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