Wood-Roasted Shrimp and Scallops with Polenta and Onion Confit

Menu Part: 
Cuisine Type: 

Enticingly flavored with rosemary these shrimp and scallop skewers are a flavorful topping for creamy polenta. Scallions, olives and onion confit garnish the dish.


4 medium tomatoes
1⁄2 cup olive oil
4 cups prepared polenta
8 scallions, small dice
1⁄2 cup butter
4 medium yellow onions, thinly sliced
8 oz. olive mix, pitted, chopped
Thyme from 8 sprigs
16 thick rosemary sprigs,
6-8-in. long
32 medium shrimp
32 large scallops
Scallions and olives, as needed for garnish


1. Toss tomatoes with half the olive oil and broil or grill until skin pops and there is some black on skin. Allow to cool; process through seive.

2. In a bowl, mix polenta with tomato liquid to taste (and color). Add scallions and 1⁄4 cup butter.
Mix well and season to taste.

3. In a skillet, heat remaining olive oil and butter, as needed. Sauté onions until caramelized, about 45 min. Add olives and thyme and sauté 3 min. more. Season to taste.

4. Thread rosemary sprigs with shrimp and scallops (4 on each). Lightly brush with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill or broil 2-3 min. on each side.

5. Place 1⁄2 cup polenta on a plate and top with one skewer each of shrimp and scallops. Serve onion confit as a condiment. Garnish with scallions and olives.

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