Wild Mushroom Baked Beans

Menu Part: 
Side Dish
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
6

Here's a new idea for baked beans: add shiitake and baby portobello mushrooms. This recipe also uses three varieties of beans—pinto, red kidney and Great Northern.

Ingredients

1 package (3.5 oz.) shiitake mushrooms, sliced
1 package (8 oz.) baby portobello mushrooms, sliced
1 cup chopped onion
2 tsp. minced garlic
2 tbsp. olive oil
2 tbsp. flour
1 can (15 oz.) pinto beans or
1 1⁄2 cups cooked dry-packaged pinto beans, rinsed and drained
1 can (15 oz.) Great Northern beans, or 1 1⁄2 cups cooked dry-packaged Great Northern beans, rinsed and drained
1 can (15 oz.) red kidney beans, or 1 1⁄2 cups cooked dry-packaged red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
1 1⁄2 cups dry white wine or vegetable broth
3⁄4 tsp. dried thyme leaves
Parsley, finely chopped, for garnish
 

Steps

1. Saute mushrooms, onion and garlic in olive oil in large skillet until tender, 8-10 minutes. Stir in flour; cook 1-2 minutes longer.

2. Combine mushroom mixture and remaining ingredients, except parsley, in 2-quart casserole.

3. Bake uncovered at 350 F for 45 minutes; sprinkle with parsley before serving.

Tip: Any desired wild or domestic mushrooms can be used in this recipe.

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