Vegetable Lasagna

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
Italian
Serves: 
6 servings

This versatile Vegetable Lasagna can be used as a main course or side dish with whatever vegetables are in season. Chef Steven Waxman, of Trax Restaurant & Café in Ambler, Pa., prefers zucchini and squash, choosing ones that are seedless or nearly seedless. For an animal-product free version—and even more versatility—you can eliminate the custard and cheese. 

Ingredients

6 eggs
1 pint heavy cream
5 sweet onions, sliced medium
1 tbsp. olive oil
Salt & pepper, to taste
Nutmeg, pinch
2 tbsp. fresh basil or parsley, chopped
4 zucchini, sliced long-ways ¼” thick
4 gold bar yellow squash, sliced long-ways ¼” thick
8 tomatoes, sliced 1/4” thick
¼ cup Parmesan, grated, divided
1 cup flour, divided

Steps

1. Preheat the oven to 350° F. Whip eggs and cream to make custard. Set aside. Sauté the onions in olive oil with salt, pepper and a touch of nutmeg, set aside and let cool. Toss zucchini and squash in large bowl with salt, pepper, nutmeg, basil and olive oil.

2. Oil bottom of pan. Create a layer of zucchini and squash, covering bottom of pan completely.  Next, make a layer of tomatoes. Top with layer of onions, then grated parmesan.  Sift a thin layer of flour on top. Cover first layer with custard. Then, repeat all layers so you end up with approximately 3 layers of each.

3. Cover with saran wrap and foil, to make air-tight. Bake covered at 350° F for 1-1/2 hours. If making animal-product free version, bake uncovered.  Let it cool thoroughly, cut into squares then re-heat to serve. At the restaurant we cool it overnight and slice before we re-heat it to serve.

Recipe by Chef Steven Waxman, Trax Restaurant & Café, Ambler, Pa.

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