Vanilla Seared Yellowtail Snapper

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
8

Coconut and vanilla turn yellowtail snapper into a mouth-watering feast. Passionfruit coulis and taro add to the tropical appeal.

Ingredients

2 tbsp. lime juice
1 clove garlic, crushed
2 lb. stone crab meat
1 red bell pepper, brunoise
1 yellow bell pepper, brunoise
1 serrano pepper, brunoise
4 scallions, sliced on the bias
2 tbsp. grapeseed oil
1 tbsp. ginger, minced
1 tbsp. cilantro, chopped
1 tbsp. dill, chopped
2 tbsp. coconut milk
1 cup passionfruit concentrate
3⁄4 cup simple syrup
3 lb. taro root, peeled, diced
6 oz. coconut milk
4 oz. toasted coconut
6 oz. butter
2 vanilla beans
6 oz. vanilla liqueur
8 6-oz. yellowtail snapper filets
Grapeseed oil, as needed Sesame seeds and toasted coconut for garnish

Steps

1. Prepare stone crab salpicon: In a large bowl, whisk together lime juice and garlic. Add next 10 ingredients and combine. Reserve chilled.

2. In a food processor, combine passionfruit concentrate and 1⁄2 cup simple syrup. Add more syrup as needed to taste. Reserve.

3. In a large pot, cover taro with water and bring to a boil; cook until tender. Drain and rice through a food mill. Fold in coconut milk, toasted coconut and butter. Reserve.

4. In a bowl, split and scrape vanilla beans; add vanilla liqueur and whisk. Place snapper filets in hotel pan and pour vanilla mixture over; marinate 15-20 min. In a skillet over medium-high heat, add oil and sear filets on both sides until done.

5. Mound hot taro in the center of a plate, top with snapper and finish with approx. 3 oz. stone crab salpicon. Nap plate with passionfruit coulis; garnish with sesame seeds, toasted coconut and a stone crab claw.

Source: Recipe from Chef Jeannie Pierola

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

The new unpaid-balance policy at Canon-McMillan School District in Pittsburgh is making waves after a former cafeteria worker sounded off about the practice on social media.

Stacy Koltiska said she quit her job with the district after being forced to take hot meals away from students who owed lunch money, CBS News reports .

Under a new policy that was implemented at Canon-McMillan this year, students whose lunch debt exceeds $25 are not allowed to receive a hot lunch. Children in grades K-6 are given a sandwich in its place, and older students receive no lunch. A recent...

Industry News & Opinion

Due to low participation in its lunch program, Talawanda School District in Oxford, Ohio, is raising the price of school meals this year, Patch.com reports .

The cost of school lunches will see a 30-cent increase, half of which is being enacted to cover the district’s budget. The other half is being required by the government to cover the cost of free and reduced-price lunches provided to low-income families. Prior to this year, the district had not raised prices since 2009.

The district’s cafeterias have experienced a decline in student participation since implementing the...

Industry News & Opinion

Six Philadelphia hospitals were honored by the city’s department of public health for healthy food initiatives introduced as part of the local Good Food, Healthy Hospitals program, bizjournals.com reports .

The hospitals each debuted healthy measures to their dining services, such as lowering the cost of water bottles and seltzers, and offering dishes that incorporate local produce. One hospital was also honored for operating its own organic farm.

The facilities that were honored were:

Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia Cancer Treatment Centers of America’s Eastern...
Sponsored Content
chili flakes and peppers spicy hot

From Catallia.

When planning your menus, take note: college and university students think spicy is hot.

Fifty-seven percent of consumers age 18-34 find spicy flavors, “extremely appealing,” according to Technomic. And almost 50% of college students surveyed said they would like their schools to offer more ethnic foods and beverages, states a recent Technomic College & University Consumer Trend Report. Translation: they like their food kicked up a notch!

More Options than Ever

“Students of today are all about flavor,” says Steve Mangan, director of dining for...

FSD Resources