Vanilla-Bourbon Milkshake with Pecan Tartlet

Menu Part: 
Dessert
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
24 servings

This milkshake is a treat in itself and paired with a pecan tartlet makes it even better.

Ingredients

Pecan Tartlets
1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
½ tsp. + ⅛ tsp. salt, divided
½ tsp.  granulated sugar
4 oz. diced cold unsalted California butter
¼ cup ice water
1 large egg
1 cup light brown sugar
1 tbsp. melted California butter
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 cup coarsely chopped pecans

Milkshake
24 cups California French vanilla ice cream
3 cups California half-and-half
3 cups bourbon whiskey
2 tbsp. vanilla bean seeds
3 cups whipped California whipped cream
24 mint sprigs

Steps

  1. To make pecan tartlets, in bowl of food processor, combine flour, ½ teaspoon salt and granulated sugar. Add diced butter; process until mixture resembles coarse meal, 8 to 10 seconds. With machine running, add 2 tablespoons ice water through feed tube in slow, steady stream. Pulse until dough holds together without being wet or sticky; be careful not to process more than 30 seconds. To test, squeeze small amount together: If it is crumbly, add more ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time. Flatten dough into disc and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour. (Dough may be stored, frozen, up to 1 month.)
  2. While dough is chilling, whisk egg and brown sugar in large bowl until smooth. Add melted butter, whisking to incorporate. Add ⅛ teaspoon salt, vanilla extract and pecans; stir well.
  3. Preheat oven to 325°F. Spray 24-hole miniature muffin pan lightly with cooking spray. On floured work surface, roll dough into evenly proportioned log about 1 ½ inches in diameter. With flour- dusted knife, cut log into ¼-inch disks. Press disk of dough into each hole of muffin pan. With fingers, gently work dough into corners and completely up sides of holes, maintaining an even ⅛-inch thickness. Trim excess dough flush with rim of pan. Fill with pecan filling to slightly below rim of dough. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until filling is set and crust is lightly golden. Cool for about 10 minutes; invert pan to remove tartlets and cool on wire rack.
Source: California Milk Advisory Board

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