Toadstool Meatloaf Stacks

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
6 servings

These individual turkey meatloaves conceal an extra dose of vegetables—something parents will appreciate when they see their kids gobble them up. Roasting mellows the zucchini, tomato and Vidalia onion topping to make it even sweeter and more kid-friendly.

Ingredients

4 slices white bread, crusts trimmed, torn into pieces
8 small sage leaves
1½ lb. ground lean turkey
1 med. sweet Vidalia onion, cut into eighths
1 carrot, peeled and cut into 2-in. pieces
1 stalk celery, cut into 2-in. pieces
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2 tbsp. tomato paste
4 tsp. Dijon mustard
1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
¾ tsp. coarse salt
½ tsp. dried thyme
Freshly ground black pepper
¾ cup ketchup
1 vine ripe tomato, cut into 6 slices
6 thick slices sweet Vidalia onion
1 large zucchini, cut into 6 slices
Extra virgin olive oil

Steps

1. Preheat oven to 375°F, with rack in center. Spray 6 muffin pan cups with vegetable cooking spray.

2. Place bread and sage leaves in the bowl of a food processor; pulse to form fine crumbs. Transfer to med. bowl, and add ground turkey.

3. Place Vidalia onion eighths, carrot and celery in bowl of food processor; pulse until finely chopped. Add to turkey mixture, using hands to combine. Add egg, tomato paste, mustard, Worcestershire, salt and thyme; season with pepper and combine well.

4. Form mixture into 6 equal balls and press into sprayed muffin tins. Pour ketchup on each meatloaf and spread evenly. Transfer pan to oven; place a baking sheet on lower rack to catch drippings. Bake until a meat thermometer inserted in center of each meatloaf registers 170°, about 45 min.

5. Meanwhile, on separate baking sheet, drizzle sliced vegetables with olive oil; season with salt and pepper. Build stacks by placing Vidalia onion slices on bottom, then zucchini, then tomato. Bake for final 15 min. with the meatloaf.

6. To serve; carefully turn out individual meatloaves and place on center of serving plate; place a vegetable stack on top of each meatloaf.

Recipe by Chef Todd Fisher, The Kitchen, Sand City, Calif. Recipe courtesy of Vidalia Onion Committee
 

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