Three-Cheese and Artichoke Potstickers

Menu Part: 
Cuisine Type: 

A new combination of ingredients dress up a tried and true favorite. Artichokes with cheeses are wrapped in a wonton skin, then browned and steamed through. Serve with Stravecchio Crema and warm Roasted Tomato Salad.


12 baby artichokes
6 tbsp. olive oil
6 garlic cloves, chopped
6 shallots, chopped
1 qt. chicken stock
1 lemon, juiced
4 sprigs thyme
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 cup shredded aged provolone cheese
1 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
1 cup shredded Asiago cheese
2 tbsp. whole-grain mustard
48 wonton wrappers
1⁄2 cup water

Roasted Tomato Salad:
8 plum tomatoes, sliced
12 crimini mushrooms, quartered
6 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
2 garlic cloves, chopped
2 tsp. fresh rosemary, chopped
Salt and pepper, to taste

Stravecchio Crema:
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup grated stravecchio Parmesan cheese


1. For Potstickers: Trim outer leaves of artichokes and cut 1⁄4-1⁄2 in. off tops. Heat 1⁄4 cup olive oil in saucepot; sauté garlic and shallots until translucent. Add artichokes, stock, lemon juice, and thyme. Season with salt and pepper. Cook 20 min. until artichokes are tender.

2. Remove artichokes, cool, and chop. In bowl, combine cheeses with mustard and chopped artichokes; blend well. Place a small amount of cheese-artichoke mixture in center of each wonton skin. Moisten edges with water and seal tightly. (Wontons may be stored on waxed paper lightly dusted with cornstarch and refrigerated until ready to cook).

3. Place 2 tbsp. olive oil in bottom of a preheated sauté pan. Add wontons, a few at a time, and brown on both sides. Add 1⁄2 cup water; quickly cover pan, allowing wontons to steam through. Repeat until all wontons are browned and steamed; keep warm.

4. For Roasted Tomato Salad: Preheat oven to 350°F. Toss tomatoes and mushrooms in olive oil; season with garlic, rosemary, salt, and pepper. Arrange in a single layer on sheet pan and roast 10 min., until tender. Cut mushrooms into quarters and then in half.

5. For Stravecchio Crema: Pour cream into a saucepan; bring to a simmer. Slowly stir in stravecchio until melted and fully incorporated; keep warm.

6. To serve, pour a small amount of Stravecchio Crema in center of plate. Arrange four wontons on the sauce and garnish with a small amount of warm Roasted Tomato Salad.

Source: Chef Rhys Lewis

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