Texas BBQ Beef Sandwich

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
12

Moist, melt in your mouth beef, smothered in Texas style BBQ sauce and held in thick, buttered Texas toast. A hearty lunch any time of year.

Ingredients

96 oz. IBP Cut and Ready Beef Strips, USDA Select, 15 percent marination
4 oz. vegetable oil
16 oz. beef broth
60 oz. smoky barbecue sauce, commercially prepared
1 tbsp. black pepper, coarse ground
24 pieces Texas toast, thick-sliced
3/4 cup melted butter
24 garlic cloves, halved lengthwise
3 oz. red onion, thinly sliced
6 oz. pickled jalapeño peppers, sliced and drained

Steps

1. Working in several small batches, heat 1/4 cup of the oil in a large sauté pan over med.-high heat. Add 48 oz. of the beef strips and sauté for 5 min. or until moisture has evaporated and the beef strips are browned on all sides.

2. Remove beef from pan and reserve. Repeat the browning process with the second batch of beef strips. Combine both batches in the sauté pan.

3. Add the beef broth and simmer while scraping up brown bits. Add the barbecue sauce and black pepper. Stir to combine.

4. Transfer BBQ beef mixture to a heavy baking pan. Cover tightly and bake in a preheated 300°F convection oven for 1 hr.

5. Transfer to another container. Cover and hold hot, above 135°F.

6. Per order, place 2 slices of Texas toast on a flat work surface. Brush one side of each toast piece with ½ tbsp. melted butter. Lightly toast bread, buttered sides down, on a flattop griddle or in a sauté pan over med. heat.

7. Rub toasted sides of each slice of Texas toast with 1 clove of garlic.

8. Place the toasted sides of the toast down and portion 8 oz. of BBQ beef on each bottom slice. Top with 1/4 oz. red onion rings and 1/2 oz. jalapeño pepper slices. Close the sandwich with the top slice of toast.

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