Strawberry Shortcake Sliders

Menu Part: 
Dessert
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
12 cakes

Dessert jumps onto the slider trend with a downsized version of the ever-popular strawberry shortcake. Serve these as part of a shareable dessert sampler, a plated dessert or as a mini indulgence on their own.

Ingredients

2 cups all-purpose flour
3 tbsp. sugar, divided
1 1/2 tbsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
8 tbsp. cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-in. pieces
2 1/4 cups heavy cream, divided
6 cups stemmed fresh strawberries, divided
1 cup simple syrup
1 tsp. vanilla extract
Confectioner’s sugar
Mint chiffonade

Steps

1. Sift flour, 2 tablespoons sugar, baking powder and salt into a bowl. With fork or pastry blender, cut in butter to fine particles.

2. Stir in 1 to 1 1/2 cups cream (enough so that dough holds together and is soft but not sticky). On floured surface, knead dough lightly a few times to form a ball. Pat into a 1/2-inch-thick circle. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 15 min.

3. Preheat oven to 400 F. With 2-inch round cutter, cut dough into 12 circles. Place on parchment-lined baking sheet and bake 15 to 20 minutes or until golden.

4. Meanwhile, in medium saucepan, simmer 4 cups strawberries with simple syrup until jamlike consistency; cool. Slice remaining 2 cups strawberries and reserve.

5. Whip 3/4 cup cream with vanilla and 1 tablespoon sugar until soft peaks form.

6. For service, split shortcakes in half horizontally. Place 3 shortcake bottoms on each of 4 plates. Top with cooked strawberry mixture, whipped cream and sliced strawberries, dividing ingredients evenly.

7. Place tops on shortcakes; dust with confectioner’s sugar and sprinkle with mint.

Recipe courtesy of California Strawberry Commission  

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