South Paws™ Pangasius Corn Bread Sliders with Roasted Red Peppers and Spinach

Menu Part: 
Appetizer
Cuisine Type: 
American

Hush puppy coated seafood and corn bread make the perfect appetizer or entrée. It’s the trendy upgrade from beef sliders.

Ingredients

5 pc of SouthPaws™ Striped Pangasius Fillets—cooked as per instructions on package
10 ea Corn Bread slider buns
3 ea Red Bell peppers
2 tblsp canola oil
1 lb Baby Spinach—Washed
1 ea garlic clove—minced
2 tblsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
½ ea Lemon
Salt and Pepper to taste

Steps

  1. Coat the red peppers in the canola oil, and roast on char broiler of stove burner open flame until thin skin is blistered and black. They will look burnt, but they are not. Place charred pepper into mixing bowl and cover tight with plastic wrap. Let sit/steam for 10 minutes.
  2. After 10 minutes, remove the peppers from the bowl. Notice that the thin/charred skin peels away from the flesh of the pepper easily. With gloves, peel all the skin away from the flesh as well as the seeds and stem. Reserve cleaned peppers.
  3. Heat up a large sauté pan. When pan is hot, add extra virgin olive oil and minced garlic. Toast for about 20 seconds, add spinach, season with salt and pepper, and toss. When spinach starts to wilt, take pan off flame, and squeeze the half lemon over the spinach and let sit. The residual heat from the pan will cook the delicate spinach the rest of the way.
  4. To assemble the sandwich, open the corn bread buns in traditional sandwich form (toast bread if desired). Cut a piece of roasted pepper the same size as the bun and lay it on the bottom half. Then, using tongs, place an equal amount of the cooked spinach on top of the roasted pepper. Cut the portions of South Paws™ Striped Pangasius Fillets in half and place on top of the red pepper and spinach. Place other half of corn bread on top, and secure with toothpick. Serve.

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