Short Ribs Braised in Port and Wine

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
12

The ultimate meat and potatoes dish. The short ribs are slowly braised in wine sauce for full-bodied flavor, and become fall off the bone tender. They are served with mashed potatoes and make a hearty and satisfying meal.

Ingredients

24 beef short ribs (20-25 lb.), crosscut to include three bones, each 6- to 7-in. section tied horizontally and vertically to resemble a package
Salt and pepper, to taste
Olive oil for sautéeing
Anchovies and chopped garlic, to taste
4 qt. small-dice mirepoix (2 parts yellow onion, 1 part each celery and carrot; turnip and celery root are good variations)
Fresh thyme and Italian parsley, hot red pepper flakes, and lemon zest, to taste
750 ml port (see note)
750 ml red wine (see note)
1 cup tomato paste or pureed dried tomatoes
Several bay leaves
Equal parts veal and chicken stock, for braising

Steps

1. Begin a full day before service. Season ribs with salt and pepper and thoroughly brown on all sides in a little oil. Remove to braising pans so ribs are touching, but not crowded.

2. Sauté anchovies and garlic in same sauté pan. Add mirepoix, herbs, hot pepper flakes, and lemon zest. Sweat briefly and deglaze with wines. Stir in tomatoes. Pour mixture over ribs and tuck in bay leaves. Add stock mixture just to level of rib tops.

3. Place in 400ºF oven; cook uncovered for 10 min. Cover and lower oven to 300ºF. Braise for at least 4 hours (often much longer), until meat is fork-tender yet holds firm. Remove, cool, and refrigerate overnight.

4. For service: Skim off congealed fat from liquid; remove rib packages and set aside. Strain liquid, reserving some for reheating ribs. Reduce the rest to consistency of thick sauce and set aside. Gently warm ribs, moistened with liquid and covered, in a slow oven.

5. Per order: Untie two rib packages; remove bones, fat, and connective tissue. Plate with mashed potatoes and sautéed vegetables, and nap with sauce.

Note: The better the quality of the port and wine, the better the sauce.

Source: Recipe from Chef Tom King

More From FoodService Director

Sponsored Content
savory yogurt parfait

From Dannon Foodservice.

What consumers eat and, most importantly, when they’re eating it has changed significantly in recent years, signaling opportunity for operators able to capitalize on this evolution.

For example, some 83% of consumers said they were daily snackers in 2016, according to Technomic’s Snacking Occasion Consumer Trend Report . That’s up from 76% just two years earlier. Snacking is growing across many channels from retail prepared foods to bakery and coffee cafes, fast-food locations and more.

Busy lifestyles, smaller households with greater meal...

Industry News & Opinion

Labor secretary nominee Andy Puzder has officially bowed out of consideration for the cabinet position, according to the Associated Press .

Puzder, CEO of CKE Restaurants—the parent company of Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr.—was tired of being under fire for hiring an undocumented immigrant as a nanny and being accused 26 years ago of physically abusing his wife, an unnamed source told CBS News . The agency reported that Puzder was unlikely to show for the start of his confirmation hearings tomorrow.

Puzder has also been attacked by organized labor for comments suggesting that...

Industry News & Opinion

Risley Dining Room at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., has just become 100 percent gluten-free, 14850.com reports.

For the past two years, the university has slowly phased out gluten in the dining hall’s menu by eliminating it in its stir fries, biscuits and brownies.

Instead of offering gluten-free versions of typical college fare, including pizza and pasta, the dining service team aimed for more sophisticated restaurant-style items.

Along with being gluten-free, Risley is also peanut free and tree-nut free.

The dining room is the second college eatery...

Industry News & Opinion

James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., recently hosted a weeklong program called Weigh the Waste, which aimed to show students how much food gets wasted in dining halls, The Breeze reports.

Throughout the week, students placed food they were about to throw away on a scale located near the trash bins at one of their dining halls. At the end of the week, the school tallied the waste and saw that 817 pounds of food had been wasted.

School officials hope that the annual program, which it’s hosted since 2015, will remind dining hall patrons to only take as much food as...

FSD Resources