Seasonal Platings: Kabocha Squash Flan

Menu Part: 
Dessert
Cuisine Type: 
Latin
Serves: 
6 servings

Chef Greg Atkinson of Marché on Bainbridge Island in Winslow, Wash., goes beyond the traditional flan, infusing the dessert with seasonal offerings. His fall flan marries heavy cream and eggs with Kobocha squash, known as the Japanese pumpkin, topped off with pumpkin seeds and pumpkin oil.

Ingredients

2 tbsp. unsalted butter
1 lb. kabocha, squash, about 1/2 of a medium specimen
1/2 medium white or yellow onion, peeled and thinly sliced
1/2 cup heavy cream
3 large eggs
1 tsp. kosher salt
6 tbsp. toasted pumpkin seeds
6 tsp. pumpkin seed oil

Steps

1. Preheat oven to 375° F. and butter six 4-ounce ramekins or glass custard cups. Place cups in a baking dish that will comfortably hold all of them and reserve.

2. Cut squash into disks or wedges and scrape out seeds, then cut away the peel. Cut the squash into 1-inch dice. You should have about 2 1/2 cups of cubed squash.

3. In a large skillet or saucepan, melt the remaining butter over medium-high heat and cook the onion 5 minutes, or until tender and golden brown, stirring often. Add cream and squash, bring the mixture to a boil, cover and reduce heat to low. Let the squash simmer gently for 15 minutes, or until tender.

4. In a blender or food processor, pulse eggs with salt, then add squash mixture. Cover the top of the machine with a kitchen towel and process using short pulses at first so that the hot mixture does not overflow when the machine is turned on. Pulse until smooth, then evenly distribute the squash mixture between the ramekins.

5. Pour boiling water into the baking dish around ramekins until it reaches halfway up the sides of the ramekins, cover baking dish with buttered baker's parchment and aluminum foil. Bake until the custard is set and no longer jiggles when the ramekins are tapped, about 25 minutes. Remove custards from oven and allow them to stand 10 minutes.

6. You can choose to serve the flans at once, or keep them warm in a 200° F. oven for up to 1 hour, or refrigerate them and then reheat as needed. To serve, loosen edges of custards with a spatula or knife, slipping the point of the spatula down the sides of the ramekins to let in enough air to release the custards. Invert custards onto plates and serve hot garnished with toasted pumpkin seeds and pumpkin seed oil. 

Recipe by Chef Greg Atkinson, Marché on Bainbridge Island, Winslow, Wash.

More From FoodService Director

Industry News & Opinion

Capital School District in Dover, Del., has a new food truck, one that will serve lunch to students during summer break, Delaware State News reports.

The truck will travel through the district every Monday through Thursday over the break and will offer lunch to anyone 18 and under.

The district offers weekly free lunch at the Capital City Farmers Market during the summer; however, school officials hope that the mobility of the food truck will help reach children who are unable to make it to the market, as well as enable staff to provide food that requires more preparation...

Sponsored Content
organic fruits veggies

From WhiteWave Away from Home.

Organic food has gone mainstream in recent years. And consumers of all ages believe organic food is not just healthier—but tastier—than conventional counterparts, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report.

No demographic group, however, values organic offerings as highly as those aged 18 to 34.

Nearly two-thirds (65%) of millennials, compared to 44% overall, say they’re more likely to purchase and willing to pay at least slightly more for menu items with organic claims, according to Technomic’s 2016 Healthy...

Industry News & Opinion

Chefs at Washington State University in Pullman, Wash., participated in plant-based food training earlier this month as part of an effort to introduce more vegetarian, vegan and allergen-free dishes on campus, The Daily Evergreen Reports.

Over two days, chefs worked in pairs with plant-based ingredients to create new dishes such as vegan pizza, cauliflower fried rice and vegetable wellington.

Washington State’s dining services said it hopes to expand the presence of plant-based dishes throughout all campus dining halls as student demand rises, noting that items with animal...

Menu Development
health food medicine stethoscope

For the last two years, Chris Studtmann has jockeyed between Northwestern University’s residential dining halls and athletic training tables in his role of executive chef, trying to meet the health and food preferences of both sides. Now, his team is taking best practices developed for the sports teams to the 20,000-plus student population, working with dietitians from the school’s contract company to better sync healthy menu choices with lifestyle needs.

Technomic’s 2016 Healthy Eating Consumer Trend Report shows younger consumers are especially tuned in to functional foods that...

FSD Resources