Sausage and Pear Breakfast Rolls

Menu Part: 
Side Dish
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
12 rolls

This may look like a typical sweet roll, but it’s packed with sausage, mozzarella and pears to create a filling, portable breakfast. The savory rolls, conveniently made with prepared pizza dough, go well with a cup of hot coffee or tea to double as a mid-morning or mid-afternoon snack.

Ingredients

1 1/2 qt. canned pear slices in juice, drained
3 cups diced sweet onions
2 tbsp. canola oil
1 tbsp. dry Italian seasoning mixture
1 1/4 lb. whole-grain pizza dough
2 cups cooked crumbled turkey sausage
1 1/2 cups grated mozzarella or cheddar cheese

Steps

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. In large bowl, combine pears, onions, oil and seasoning; toss well to coat. Transfer to sheet pan; roast 35 to 40 minutes until golden. Remove from heat; scrape pear-onion mixture from pan into large bowl and allow to cool.
  2. On clean work surface, roll out pizza dough into a 14-by-18-inch rectangle. Top dough with roasted pear-onion mixture in even layer, leaving 1-inch border all around. Sprinkle dough with crumbled cooked sausage and grated cheese. Gently roll dough strudel style from the longer end, to encase filling. Chill dough several hours (roll will stretch to about 24 inches).
  3. Preheat convection oven to 350°F. Just before baking, slice roll into 2-inches slices. Place cut-side down onto parchment-lined sheet pans or greased large muffin tins. Bake rolls about 18 minutes, or until golden brown and cooked through. Serve warm.
  4. Baked rolls may be cooled to room temperature, covered with plastic wrap and refrigerated. To reheat, remove plastic and reheat in 225°F oven for 25 to 35 minutes or until completely heated through.
Source: Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest Canned Pear Service

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