Sage Honey and Cornflake Crusted Chicken Apple Sausage on a Stick

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
American
Serves: 
8

Here’s a healthy variation on that county fair favorite—the corn dog. Chef Downs coats chicken apple sausage with sage honey and cornflake crumbs, then bakes them instead of deep-frying. The yogurt dipping sauce is sweetened with the same herbal honey and cinnamon. Try it as a to-go treat for breakfast or snacking.

Ingredients

Dipping Sauce:
1½ cups vanilla flavored Greek-style yogurt
1/4 cup chopped pecans, lightly toasted
½ cup sage honey
1 tsp. ground cinnamon

Sausages:
8  (2 oz.) chicken apple sausage links
1 large egg, beaten
1 cup low-fat milk
½ cup sage honey, divided
½ tsp. kosher salt
¼ tsp. fresh ground black pepper
1¼ cups all-purpose flour
3 cups crushed corn flakes

Steps

  1. Prepare Dipping Sauce: Combine all sauce ingredients in a blender or processor and blend until smooth. Refrigerate to chill.
  2. Prepare Sausages: Heat a large nonstick skillet over med. heat. Place sausages in pan and brown evenly on all sides. Remove from pan and blot dry on paper towels; reserve.
  3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line large sheet pan with parchment paper.
  4. In bowl, combine egg, milk, 1/4 cup honey, salt, pepper and flour. Whisk until well blended. Transfer batter to a shallow dish long enough to dredge sausages.
  5. Skewer each sausage lengthwise on bamboo skewers, leaving a 3-in. handle. Pour crushed cornflakes into shallow container or plate. Dredge sausage skewers in batter then coat in crushed cornflakes.
  6. Place coated skewers on parchment lined sheet pan. Bake in preheated oven for 7 min. Turn sausages and drizzle with remaining honey. Bake 5 min. longer; remove from oven. Serve sausage skewers with dipping sauce.
Source: National Honey Board

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