Saag Tofu

Menu Part: 
Entree
Cuisine Type: 
Indian
Serves: 
6 servings

This dish, which is also known as palak paneer, is a take on a classic indian dish that features spinach and paneer. Here tofu substitutes for the paneer cheese and also features crushed tomatoes, mustard greens, onion and ginger root.

Ingredients

10 oz. mustard greens
6 oz. frozen leaf spinach, thawed
11⁄2 tbsp. ginger root, rough chop, divided
6 tbsp. hot water
11⁄2 tsp. canola oil
4 oz. onions, diced 1⁄4-in.
11⁄4 tsp. garlic, fresh, minced
1 tbsp. jalapeño peppers, minced
1⁄4 tsp. ground cumin
1⁄2 tsp. ground coriander
1 tsp. paprika
2 tbsp. crushed tomatoes
1⁄2 tsp. salt
11⁄2 tsp. fresh lemon juice
1⁄2 oz. unsalted butter
71⁄2 oz. firm tofu, cubed
Oil for frying

Steps

1. Remove all center thick veins of mustard greens, and chop large leaves. Wash mustard greens several times to remove dirt.

2. Place mustard greens and spinach in pot on medium heat along with 1 tbsp. of ginger and hot water. Cover and steam for approximately 10 minutes, until wilted.

3. Transfer greens to blender or food processor and process to rough purée.

4. In medium pot add oil. Sauté onions until light brown, about 8 minutes, add remaining ginger, garlic and jalapeño, and cook about 2 more minutes, until aromatic.

5. Add cumin, coriander and paprika and sauté for 2 minutes.

6. Add crushed tomatoes, turn heat to medium low, sauté for about 5 minutes, or until fat starts to
separate.

7. Add puréed greens and sauté for 10 more minutes.

8. Add salt, lemon juice and butter. Stir until butter is fully incorporated.

9. Deep-fry tofu at 350°F until golden brown, about 15 seconds; drain well. Or, in preheated 350°F oven, bake tofu in pan lightly spayed with vegetable oil for 10 to 15 minutes, until light brown. Combine tofu with greens. (Or add cold tofu to cooked hot greens and heat.) Serve 1⁄2 cup per portion.

Recipe by Sodexo Corporate Services, gaithersburg, Md.

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